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The amount was determined by his primary doctor.

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Well, Jeanne, I understand that his doctor knows about the medicines and still said he could have the wine, BUT if she observes that he is walking differently and that it effects his behavior, then I would overrule the doctor on that and either cut the alcohol or cut *out* the alcohol. I am not a drinker, but that doesn't mean that I keep others from drinking if they want to. And I have heard many times that red wine is good for you. It gives me a headache so I don't drink it. I totally agree with you that as we age, we have to give up so many things. I for one, can no longer tolerate ice cream. That's a hard one, but just not worth the after effects. Also, I'm not familiar with blood pressure medicine and the effect wine would have on them.

You do bring up a point though. I wonder how long he has been drinking wine in the evening. If it's something new, or long standing habit. Well, anyway, I think if she's concerned about it, that she could at least try to dilute it and see if that helps. I hope she comes back to tell us if it worked!
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But, txcamper, his doctor knows what else he is taking and about the fall risks.

My husband took more than 20 meds. I was always with him when he had alcohol and I was especially watchful of his walking afterwards. We never had any problems but I did keep an eye on him.

(My husband often appeared drunk in his walking, with no alcohol consumption at all. People would give us strange looks as we walked down a hallway at 10 in the morning! He never appeared worse after a bottle of beer, but, as I say, I did keep an extra cautious eye on him.)

I can't drink alcohol because of some meds I'm on. It is not a huge deal to me, but sometimes with friends who are discussing the merits of various wines, I do feel a little deprived. And I fully understand the reasons and concur with the decision -- I can imagine how deprived I'd feel if I didn't understand the reasons and it just seemed like someone was being mean to me! I did not want to deprive my husband of a pleasure his doctors said he could have.

But if the alcohol does in fact pose a problem, I kind of like the idea of alcohol-free wine or beer. Depends on the person's cognitive level, I guess, and perhaps experience level with alcohol in the past.
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The impression I got was that it made him drunk-like and therefore a fall risk.

Mixed with the blood pressure medicines it may have a bigger impact on him.
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My husband, Lewy Body Dementia, was told by both his geriatrician and his neurologist that he could have two alcohol beverages per day. Some days he didn't have any but he was pleased to be able to order a beer or wine when we ate out or when he watched a ball game.

If you are trying to prevent your husband from having his two glasses, I'm wondering why. If he insists on more, that is a different issue.

People with dementia lose so very much of their former pleasures and abilities. I would hesitate to remove something else without a very good reason.
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Try alcohol free wine, at grocery stores or liquor stores. One brand is Fre. I would do this to avoid they stress of taking something from him....won't know the difference
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Or mix the wine with grape juice or carbonated grape juice (my mom loves that). 12 ounces of straight wine seems to be a lot to me for an elderly person, particularly one with Alzheimers.
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Not being a wine drinker, I don't know if this is even possible. Can you water down the wine? I mean, he has dementia, would he know if you did that?
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longivity might be a desirable thing but it isnt ( imo ) as important as qol . im dumping out my iced coffee right now and replacing it with two beers . ( not joking )
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Do you mean that he drinks more than the 12 ounces?
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He is unwilling to give up his wine consumption each evening. He is on many medications for high blood pressure. He seems unsteady when walking and becomes very talkative. What should I do?
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