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My father has financial DPOA on my grandmother. The DPOA was sprung by two doctors' letters deeming her mentally incompetent (Alzheimer's). A bank account was opened in her name, utilizing the DPOA and doctors' letters. My grandmother has since signed a Revocation of DPOA and my uncle has sent it in to the bank. My grandmother doesn't understand the consequences of her actions and in fact doesn't recall signing the document a week after doing so. My uncle is attempting to gain access to my grandmother's money. The bank has stopped recognizing the doctors' letters they used to set-up the account and honoring the revocation. I don't understand how the bank can flip / flop on their position. If they bank would have not recognized the doctors' letters to begin with, the account would have been set-up at a different bank. Please note that two other major banks (Chase and BofA) have recognized the sprung DPOA as a valid instrument for my father to conduct financial matters on my grandmother's behalf. How do I get the bank to change their position without filing for conservatorship/guardianship?

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I agree that the bank's position is illogical. As a practical matter, having an attorney contact the bank and review the situation may resolve it most expeditiously. If all else fails, seeking appointment of a conservator in court would clearly give the conservator full power over the bank account.
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Kodoney, I'm sorry your family is in this difficult situation. Your best bet at this point would be for your to contact an attorney. The only way to resolve this is for a judge to rule on the validity of the revocation. As your grandmother was declared incompetent by two doctors, the next step would be for a court to appoint a guardian.
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