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My dr. mistakenly prescribed "hospice" for my 1-month post-op stay at a local nursing home//

If it was a mistake on the part of the doctor I would sue the doctor
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This is the way it was explained to me: If you decided to take a hospice patient to the hospital, you or the patient (not hospice) can decide to terminate hospice. The person with the decision-making power can, I believe, always terminate hospice care. After the hospital visit or stay, hospice can be resumed, but there might be limitations on when it can resume.
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Hello, this is a very interesting question with some grey area.

Per Medicare guideline:
- When you choose hospice care, you've decided that you no longer want care to cure your terminal illness and/or your doctor has determined that efforts to cure your illness aren't working.

- How long you can get hospice care
Hospice care is for people with a life expectancy of 6 months or less (if the disease runs its normal course). If you live longer than 6 months, you can still get hospice care, as long as the hospice medical director or other hospice doctor recertifies that you’re terminally ill (with a life expectancy of 6 months or less).

Please see below link for additional Hospice & respite care details:
https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/hospice-and-respite-care.html
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My dr. mistakenly prescribed "hospice" for my 1-month post-op stay at a local nursing home. Naturally Medicare was not interested in paying, so I had to shell out some $10K. But the social worker at the home got on Medicare's case and persuaded it that I wasn't in fact on Hospice--just post-op recovery. So be careful about your health care provider ordering, especially if you think you have a reasonable chance of leaving while still alive!
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It all depends on what your last wishes are. If you have a DNR (do not resuscitate), then there is no need for a hospital. When you are on hospice, your doctor has determined you have at least 6 months or less to live.
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Hospice patients can be admitted for "respite care"...to give the caregivers at home a chance to test. The Medicare covered respite admission is typically no more than five days, but check with your Hospice organization for confirmation. Hospice patients aren't typically received at the ED for typically emergencies, but what Hospice will respond to (and cover) is increased discomfort - typically nausea, pain, falls and increased agitation or hallucinations. The focus is on alleviating those symptoms, but not treating the cause. Palliative care is similar, but has different guidelines for coverage. Talk with the clinical staff at your Hospice for details.
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Is palliative care and alternate option to hospice ?
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My mom was on Hospice care for over three years. Twice we took mom to the hospital. She fell and I called to tell them I was taken her for x-rays. The other time my dad called 911 and she was taken to the hospital. I called Hospice and they came to the hospital. We decided if it was an emergency we would not wait for Hospice. Hospice is not always available to come right at that moment. Seemed like it always happened at night or weekends and it did take a while for them to get there. Both times insurance paid. The night she died I called to let them know she was dying. They were with another patient and did not make it til after she was gone. Depending on the circumstances, if it is emergency call 911 but always notify Hospice. Just tell the EMT he is under Hospice care, they may deem it not serious and decide not to transport him.
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Hershey, youre lucky and I hope they dont realize. I got off Hospice because if my mom needed a doctor or 911 they said i had to call them or pay privately. I am so glad I got off because my Mom had a sudden first time ever, grand mal Seizure on the toilet that wouldnt stop. Thank god for 911. The 3 minutes it took them to get there was by far quicker than calling a Hospice nurse. It took several men to get her up and out if bathroom, onto a stretcher, and to the hospital. Unfortunately she never woke up and died 4 days later in the Hospital. Even if dying, hospice doesnt stay 24/7 . My mom had 34 hour care with an iv morphine drip and suctioning every hour. I could have Never done that alone. I always thought it would be ok to die at home, not the way she went. Seriously, i personally know people have loved hospice at home but I've had more people prefer not to have it unless its a Hospice House. Good luck
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My husband is on Hospice and the other night he fell and I knew that he fell into the shower. I called 911 to help get him up. He was awake talking and in good shape.The EMT checked in out put him back in the bed. A little while later I asked him where he was hurting because he will not tell me if he is hurting. He said that his side hurt so I called 911 again and they took him to the ER. All bills were paid by Medicare and our insurance. Go figure!!!
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Both of my parents are on Hospice. They were being cared for in their home, although we have just moved them to a facility (where they are still on Hospice). We were told that if either of them needed to go to the hospital, to be sure to tell them at check in that we wish to opt out of Hospice care. This would insure the Medicare and their insurance would pay for the visit/stay. Once the hospital visit was over, Hospice would be reinstated.
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It would be as others have said a call hospice would make. I have seen patients go to hospital and return to their living enviroment but it was hospice that sent them. It is rare though as once a person is on hospice they are not seeking intervention to cure them they are chosing to remain comfortable during the end of life process. There are 20 different hospice org.in the atea I live in and their processes vary some so you should check with the hospice you are or are going to be linked with.
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Hospice is all about comfort care -- nothing to work toward a cure. They can generally provide good comfort care without an ER visit. For example, my husband was extremely uncomfortable and the hospice nurse decided he probably needed a catheter. She brought in a sterile kit from her car and within 20 minutes the problem was solved! If hospice cannot provide that kind of immediate relief they may send you to a hospital, but you must call them and let them decide how to handle the issue.

If they don't think a hospital is necessary but you do, you can withdraw from hospice at that point, and proceed to the hospital.

Generally, persons on hospice don't have much need for hospital care, and really don't want to be transported away from where they are comfortable.
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I would talk to Hospice first, I was told to call them for whatever we needed. Going to the hospital would stop your hospice.
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Not typically. Once someone goes on hospice all Dr.'s visits, ER visits, outside intervention of any kind is discontinued. If someone on hospice has an emergency they're advised to call the 24-hour number to the hospice provider.

If someone on hospice does go to the ER the hospice may discontinue services.

There is something called open access hospice where the person may seek outside medical care but it has to be discussed with the hospice provider first.
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