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My mom is in a convescent hospital, and my stepfather is refusing ALL care for her. I believe she has another UTI and will die without the proper medication. Do I have any rights to overstep his direction and get the medical care she needs?

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I don't know how she can be in a hospital or rehab facility and not be receiving any treatment. Are you in the US? Generally insurance won't pay for hospitalization or rehab if no treatment is being given. At that point some other arrangements would have to be made, such as hospice care.

It would be helpful to know how old your mother is, how advanced her dementia is, where you are, why her husband does not want her treated, and whether she is on hospice care. Unless you have a document giving you legal authority to act on her behalf I doubt you can override her husband's directions. But if we knew more about the situation, perhaps we could provide more specific responses.

I am so sorry that you are in this very difficult situation.
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A DNR is just that, if they are in a life threatening condition, dying, they do not want life support and such. However, it does not mean to not treat normal ailments such as a UTI.
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Spouses do supercede children and any other relative. The importance of having an Advanced Directive cannot be stressed enough. A DNR , on the other hand, is a carefully-worded document that includes ONLY the provisions that a patient may request if certain medical conditions are apparent.
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If you are not the Health Care Proxy then you have no legal right to override his decision. Can you provide more background? Is your mom in the advanced stages of ALZ? Who is HCP? Does she have a living will and DNR order?

My mother's facility would test for, and treat, a UTI, even with a DNR. If you can't discuss this with your stepfather, speak to the head nurse on the floor to find out if they have done a urine sample. She/he may not be able to discuss specifics (if you are not HCP) but may be able to give you reassurance that it's not something as simple as a UTI. My mother has a DNR order and has made it plain she is ready to leave this earth. But I would certainly want a UTI treated.
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Always some difficult questions here. I would approach the physician and have him intervene. Physicians always seem to help with answers to some form of treatment and I think if she has a UTI she would be experiencing some sort of discomfort. How could anyone not treat discomfort? Talk with the physician alone, tell him your concerns. He should able to do something or convince somebody to do something. If that doesn't work pound away at the spouse until your asked to leave. If typical stepfather and stepdaughter relationship exists this maybe right up your alley. Go for it, it could be your chance to get additional visuals of who he really is.
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You don't have any right to overrule your stepfather's instructions, necessarily, but you have a perfect right to express your concerns to your mother's primary physician (her attending at the convalescent hospital). You won't necessarily get much of a reply, but at least you'll have tried.

Treatment has to have a point. What is the point of treating one infection only for your mother to succumb to a worse one shortly after? I'm sorry if this seems cruel, but please do remember to take her deteriorating quality of life into account. Treating her may not be in her best interest, and if her physicians didn't agree with your stepfather they certainly would have the authority to raise the alarm.
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No. Spouses supersede any children. Your mother may have a DNR (do not resuscitate) for her medical directives and those are her wishes. You will have to honor them.
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Your mom has dementia, according to your profile. Is your stepfather her primary caregiver? Is he worn out? Does he have medical poa? Perhaps she has expressed to him, in the past, that she no longer wanted to live with dementia, that she WANTED treatment withheld at some point. It's an easier conversation to have with a spouse than with a beloved child.
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First of all, why is he denying her treatment? Does he want her to die? Sorry about the bluntness, but that;s just not right. How old is your mother? My stepdad would not let us have a say in my mom's care, either when she was very ill with diverticulitis and depression. IMO it was a control thing with him.
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Did she have any advance directives? A living will of some sort? Judges are far more likely to side with a husband or wife, unless you have a Health Care Proxy.
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