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My mother lived in another state and we bought her back to our state and she is now in an AL memory care facility. We have her POA from her Will which was drawn up in her state and now we will be selling her property so that she can afford the AL community. For Medicare purposes or any other reason, do we need to make her a resident in our state? Obviously she doesn't drive (she has an expired drivers license) but should we take her to the DMV to get an ID? Any help will be appreciated.

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swright2: I have to ask if your mother possibly has vision problems. If so, she could get a photo ID from the Commissioner of the Blind.
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We were in a similar situation. I had to get all of Mom's papers updated: the POA's both medical and financial, and a couple pages of the trust needed to be updated, each state has their own verbiage that makes the documents more "legal" in that state. (although to be honest, nobody, local banks, local doctors, the memory care home has refused us anything or demanded updated paperwork)
I also took her to get a local photo ID (not driver's license) but it was at the same office as the driver's license tests and actually had my daughter take her driver's test the same time.
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You say you have moved her to a different state. I believe for Medicare purposes you need to have her health insurance from the state or region that she lives in. If she has a Medicare Advantage plan this only covers certain regions of the state she was from and may not cover her in a different area of the country. If she had a supplement plan the premium is based on what area of the country she lives in. In that case her Part D insurance would need to be changed to where she is now living. Moving a Senior is very complex on the insurance front. Contact your local Office of Aging for assistance with this.
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Our province has an ID card mainly for younger people who don't drive but need it for going to bars etc but older people can access it too - check where you live for similar

You really should up to date photo ID for her if you can get it 
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Definitely! Showing both ID and insurance cards are the norm for any health care visits where I live. Some do an actual photo for their system to Eye verify as well. Make good readable copies of her old license as some states shred the old one upon its surrender.

See if your states DL bureau/Dept of Transportation does appointments so that she does not have to wait quite as long. While your at DOT site try to find the items needed to get a handicapped placard at the same time as new license so you have it to use when you take mom on appointments.

I’d suggest that also if at all possible that mom has her banking in a bank that is in both states with you as a signatory and POD to you. It will make things smoother especially if it takes a while to sell her property. Move her SS and retirements to direct deposit into this new acct as well. Should mom ever need to apply for Medicaid, doing all this establishes her residency, which Medicaid needs for eligibility.

Also I’d get a new dpoa, mpoa and a codicil to her existing will drawn up. If these were done fairly recently, call the old atty. to get a referral in new state. Usually the referred atty will do new documents for somewhat less as professional courtesy discount.
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For Medicare (Federal) no - but for Medicaid (State) yes
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I would get her an ID if she can go to the DMV and sign the paperwork. In NJ you have to have a certain number of points. Keep her expired license. You may need her SS card and birth certificate. Also proof of address.
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Swright, if you can I think it would be a good idea to get Mom a new ID license from the DMV. Any time one goes to a doctor's office, the front desk usually asked for one's Medicare card and a driver's license.

You probably would need a copy of a bill with Mom's new address to help prove she now lives in the area [like the bill from the Assisted Living facility or a summary from Medicare or her supplemental insurance].

Call your local DMV and ask what would Mom need. There might be other documents needed.
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