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She goes to the local senior center once a week because I volunteer there. She will not go additional days. I manage her finances, doctor appts., and take her out to eat and to food shop. She is not grateful and has said it is my job to make her happy. She is jealous and envious of my new relationship,my job and pretty much anything that makes me happy. I've struggled over the last 1 1/2 years with this and don't want to live with her anymore. I've tried talking to her about how our relationship would be better if we lived separately, but she will not talk about it and gives me the silent treatment. I have DPOA, but do not want to "force" her to move into senior living. She will not allow a visiting caregiver or anyone else to live in the home. What are my options? I don't feel right moving out as she has early stages of dementia. I am 61 years old.

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Thank you for your help and encouragement. I did not think of our family friend who is a chaplain. He is aware of our situation and has helped us before. I think he would be a great person to facilitate a conversation with my Mom. I have taken her to independent and assisted living facilities. But as with the senior center, she states "I don't want to be around old people". Thanks again to Babalou, Eyerishlass, and geewiz for your replies.
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As poa, you are responsible to arrange for care.

if she's able, I'd take her on some tours of independent/assisted living facilities. I'd make plans to move out and talk about them. Don't argue, just explain that this is better for both of you. Allow her to make the choice, care in her home by an agency or a nice facility.
. "Those are the choices, mom. You are allowed to choose from those two. " and no, it's not your job to entertain her.
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Unfortunately, POA can't force a person into an assisted living facility. POA doesn't have that power.
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WOW, quite a challenge! As many others have stated here, the caregiving needs for an aging parent (especially one with dementia) increases and sometimes rather quickly! Consider if there is another person in Mom's life that she trusts, someone who may be able to facilitate a good conversation. (Think clergy, long time friend, etc) List the benefits of living (nearby) but separately. More companionship, activities, etc. Explain that you are only one person , one with a job and therefore as time passes, she will be alone more frequently and may need the company of others (help, or whatever). Depending upon the financial situation, try to find a living arrangement that suits her needs currently and will allow more assistance as time passes. I have seen residents in senior housing that all look out for each other. Some (in my area) are run by the county and have social services on site to assist. Those residents are always 'doing some activity'.

Regardless, make your plans to move out on your own. I don't mean tomorrow, but if you have a plan you are working towards, it is an incentive for her to 'move along' as well. Good luck.
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