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Mum's had Alzheimers since 2011. She's done very well and had quality of life for the most part. She lives with her husband and the last 6 months the pressure has increased. I have mum with me for on my two days off a week and my husband and I often have mum and husband for dinner at weekend. So my life revolves around my job and looking after mum. We've all coped well but lately mum's has deteriorated. She's desperately trying (too hard) to appear normal. But although she looks lovely, hair and makeup she is totally mixed up about everything and remembers nothing. Our conversations consist of me trying to make everything normal to make her feel secure. She can no longer do anything alone or even be at home alone, as shd would leave vooker on or be a danger to herself I'm exhausted. I'm sure her husband won't be able to cope much longer then she will come and live with me and my husband and I'll give up my job. Any body got any idea what stage she is at?

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Thanks Sunny girl. Yes I know what you mean bout the stages. She indeed does have traits ftom all stages. But even when she is totally confused and repeating the same questions, my loving caring mum peeps out behind those dead eyes. I know it will be absolute hell having her to live with us but I know her so well and it would honestly finish her off if she went in a home. Her husband , (not my dad) is at the end of his tether.
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You can read the stages and likely find that she has some of the characteristics from several stages at once. I've also read that you go to the stage for which she has at least one factor. But, I'm not sure. Keep in mind that their abilities can fluctuate with some traits being exhibited and then not for a period of time. It's quite perplexing to me.

I would just read a lot about what to expect and also read what other caregivers have experienced. I'd do that before giving up a job. It's a pretty ambitious task that requires a lot of help if you are providing care in the home. And so cost is a consideration. I might take her for a week just so you can see what's actually involved. Some dementia patients talk and repeat nonstop. It can be draining. There are also things like sleep disorders that prevent you from sleeping at night. I'd talk to your dad candidly about what he is experiencing. Normally, the person puts on a good front, but, what happens at home is quite different.
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