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I know some people in family can and be paid. My sister and nephew have recently moved out. When they lived with us they help out financially. Now that they're gone, we are struggling financially as we live on my husbands disability check and savings. If I were to work we would'nt be getting anywhere as anything I earned could only pay a small portion of the days I work and we would'nt be getting anywhere. We will not look at reverse mortgages or annuities as a means of getting cash. Those kind of things only make more money for the lending agency in the long run. Can I, the wife, be paid to be his caregiver. I'm aware that other family members or folks other than family, can be paid by the state, but I have'nt heard anything solid in regards to the spouse. I would chart meticulous notes and charting for the care I give him so that a record of legitimacy would be established for state authorities. I live in Washington state.

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I think think back on my cousin's situation, it may not have been a public agency paying ... it might have been insurance related to the car accident. I just don't know. In any case, it won't hurt you to explore the possibilities.
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Rulared, my cousin's wife was permanently disabled in a car accident. He commuted some distance to work, and the pay he made was less than what social services was paying for a caregiver for her while he was away during the day. The logical thing would have been for the agency to give him the job and let him stay home with her. Amazingly, that is exactly what they did! This was at least a couple of decades ago.

So ... while I think it is unusual for a spouse to be paid I don't think it is totally out of the question. Where I would start with this is to call your county's social services department and ask for a needs assessment on your husband. They will evaluate him and see if he qualifies for any aid. If he is eligible for some assistance, the next step is to see if/how you could qualify to provide it. Are his care needs and your financial situation such that he might qualify for Medicaid?

The other avenue I'd try is the agency on aging for your area. Explain your situation to them as you have here.

The answers might all be No, but you won't know until you ask.
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If you are your husband's appointed POA or was appointed Guardenship by a court then odds are it would be stated in your paper work if you can be paid or not.For you to be paid requires a Court/Judge to approve it.If you are his POA you need to have your POA revised by a attorney/Judge for this to happen.If not noted in your POA you can not be paid for services.You need to talk with a attorney fast.
Also,you need to have a Medicare trust created before it's too late.If not the nurcing home/Medicaid will seek the home and accounts.
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The first question will be, who will be paying you? Chances are your only source of payment would come from other family members. Then you will be self-employed, and you will need to send to the IRS quarterly income taxes.

Don't forget, a certified paid Caregiver from an Agency usually works 8 hours and goes back to his/her home to rest, and starts the next day fresh. If you plan to be your husband's only Caregiver, at some point later on you will be working 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no vacation time, and if you are sick, there won't be anyone to call in to replace you. You will burn out rather quickly.

It would make more sense for you to work and use THAT money to pay a Caregiver to come in during the day while you are at work.... yes, you probably would break even, but you wouldn't have the stress of being a 24/7 Caregiver.

I have read where 1 out of every 3 Caregiver dies leaving behind a parent/spouse. Those aren't good odds.
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