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My Dad, (long distance) is 80, a severe alcoholic who refuses any kind of care, won't go to a primary care doctor because they give blood tests. (At least that is what we think the reason is). But he will go to his Urologist and Cardiologist.

I have heard that he smells like alcohol. I keep hoping something will happen that he gets treatment, even at this late stage. Why don't his specialists say anything to him? He has bruises all over his arms from falling and walking into things.

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No, I don't want him to do anything against his will. I just thought they might be able to convince him to at least see a primary care doctor who might talk to him about it.
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It sounds like you want him to have treatment for alcoholism against his will. Is that right? How do you envision this happening? His urologist or cardiologist does a urine test or a blood test or a sniff test, and says "you are drinking too much, so you need to go to treatment for that. I'll refer you to a good program." And then what?
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He would never allow a urine test. That is why he only goes to his Urologist and Cardiologist. He says he is being treated for prostate cancer and apparently undergoing chemotherapy. He complains of the side effects. He is doing this all by himself. He will not allow me to visit and my brother down there has abandoned him.
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A dr, can get a good idea if a patient is drinking just from a urine test. The blood protein is low because when drinking, the person urinates a lot which flushes out the proteins. They probably ask him if he is drinking alcohol but if he is not honest with them, there is only so much the dr. can do.
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He probably covers up his arms when he goes. But they must smell him! I can just tell that they aren't saying anything.
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How do you know that they don't say something to him? Don't you think it is possible that they are advising him to see his primary care provider about his falls?
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