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She has diabetes, which causes chronic leg pain, and changes in the way her feet are shaped. Her legs are getting weaker, and I am afraid of her falling. She wants, in the worst way, to purchase a scooter. Money is not the issue; instead, son wants her to "use her legs" for as long as possible. I wish there was something I could do about this situation.

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We finally got mom an electric chair.she had wanted one for years.I have to say it was nice to not see her in pain..like she had been for many years on her legs...
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purplesushi: you're absolutely right, the commercials are deceiving. To answer your question about supervision, her son is there week-nights, and I am there all weekend, and one day during the week. So, she's alone for most of the days during the week. That can't be too safe, for her getting off & on a scooter, especially when her legs are simply going to get weaker from (more) lack of use.
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They don't see the downside because those stupidly "cute" scooter commercials show completely unrealistic circumstances! They all look healthy as can be, zipping along & spinning circles in the kitchen (weeee!!! doesn't that look like FUN???) - they don't have a disclaimer (that I have seen) that warns of the dangers of long-term use. If used constantly, the person will lose all ability to transfer themselves - INCLUDING into the scooter! Personally, I don't think they should be allowed to be used inside the home unless it is a last-resort and ONLY under supervision..completely contrary to the "regain your independence" sales pitch on the commercials, right??
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Thank you (all) for your input; you're absolutely right about "use it or lose it". She really does not see the reality of losing mobility, in the event she gets a scooter; she simply says she does not care--she doesn't realize how much harder it will be on herself and a caregiver, when she needs to get up and move.
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What do the doctor's say? I would say check with the doctor because falling and breaking a hip or a bone can be so much more traumatic

Also nothing was said as to whether the mother is of sound mind and body, if so then it should be between her and her doctor..
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purplesushi's right: If someone with mobility issues relies on a walker or, in this case, a scooter, her legs will grow weaker from not using them. But we don't want someone falling either. We don't want mom to fall so we get her an assistive device (a scooter in this case) to make things easier on her. But in doing so mom's legs will get weaker if she's using the scooter. It's a vicious cycle. The scooter will help her get around but her legs will grower weaker still so that she has to use the scooter more. There are PT leg exercises mom can do to try to keep up the strength in her legs but I think once she commits to a scooter and realizes how much easier it is you'll have to use it all the time soon. So scooter or no scooter? As long as you are aware that her ability to walk will decline once you have the scooter you're going into it with your eyes open and can make a choice that suits son and mom the best.
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Does she live with her son, to where she has "supervision" inside of the home? Her son is right (sort of) in that once you "give in" to moving around on a scooter (or any type of wheelchair, actually), her mobility will only keep decreasing as her legs get weaker and weaker from non-use. The phrase "use it or lose it" is very true in this circumstance! I have seen it first-hand with my mother - she is also diabetic and has leg pain issues. Of course if she is not able to take more than a step or two without danger of falling, that might be different, but if she is "able" to walk, just not for long distances, perhaps she can make a compromise with him to only use a scooter when she is out and about (shopping/church/dr. appointments) but to continue to use her walker when she is in the house?
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