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Good job Igloo...very accurate. In my state WA, the max SSI is $735 for 2017.
One thing to add about SSDI... it is possible to get it with less than 10 years work covered by FICA taxes. That would generally apply to younger workers who become disabled early on. Refer to the SS website ssadotgov for more info on this aspect of SSDI disability. To make it even more complicated there are also people who are DACs who are Disabled Adult Children. These are adults who were disabled as children who can draw benefits from their deceased or disabled parent's accounts. This is all complicated federal law but getting the acronyms correct really helps to clarify what benefits and rules come into play.
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You know there needs to be an acronym glossary for all this.......

Here's my understanding on SSI vs. SSDI:
- 1 st SSDI also gets written as SSD, which can make things even MORE confusing. Nothing but fun there.
- SSDI / SSD is an disability insurance entitlement that anyone who paid into FICA for at least 10 years can get regardless of current income & assets. It hinges on "disabled".
- SSDI is income and averages about $ 1,165 but some get more & some get less as its tied into the amount you built up / paid into FICA on the entitlement. (it's similar to regular SS as it -SS- too varies depending on how much you paid in over the years via FICA and what age you filed for SS)
- SSDI is funded through the Social Security Trust Fund
- SSDi has a 5 mo waiting period
- SSDI can get mediCARE 2 years after SSDI eligibility
- the SSDI's spouse and kids get a dependent benefit

Meanwhile for SSI
- is "means tested" or "at need" benefit. It technically (i think) is not an actual legally defined entitlement like SSDI or regular SS.
- is NOT funded by the SS Trust Fund. Paid by taxes.
- SSI really for those super low income, or never really worked. Just what the income level is varies. But SSI has the 2k in non-exempt assets limits like what NH medicaid requires.
- $ 733 mo standard benefit in 2015. I think it's still the same. Vegas, any insight on $ amount?
- although $ 733 is standard benefit, it is considered income BUT can be reducedif other income sources. So often it's way less than $733.00 a mo paid by SSI 
- SSI since low income usually means qualified for Medicaid & SNAP as well.
- often folks apply for SSI so they can get Medicaid coverage ASAP
- no spouse or dependent paid income benefits. But if household is low income, some may qualify on their own for other programs. Like kids qualify for CHIP or free meals at school.
- Overall household income matters so if spouse works, they made need to clearly provide documentation as to household & health care costs to offset income to be within the income limits for SSI.

They are very different but have overlap in the documentation required to qualify. SSDI is easier as your FICA info is accessible by SSA. SSI to me is harder as many applicants are low income, so perhaps less educated, limited language skills, etc & find documenting "need" difficult.
Holly Golightly's are rare..... but she would get SSI but not SSDI.
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Bringing this back up to the top......help is on the way.
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do not despair all help is welcome
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Disclaimer:
I believe this case is way beyond my limited knowledge.

I withdraw my answers, feeling criticized by Vegaslady that "Good grief, answers are all over the place".

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Good grief, answers all over the place. Yes your income from whatever source counts for Medicaid purposes. SSI and SSDI are NOT both automatic qualifying for MedicAid, only SSI is. Classic MedicAid with SSI will end if your income changes from SSI to SSDI and should be increasing in amount. You still have to wait the 24 months before qualifying for Medicare. In this period of time you may have to check and see if you are eligible for other medical coverage under the ACA (Obamacare) or the private marketplace. You may have a "spend down", where the coverage only kicks in when you have medical bills that exceed the money you are considered to have available. The money available is quite a bit as what you are considered to need is low and irrelevant to what you actually spend on basics. So...when, if, you transition from SSI to SSDI, you probably lose MedicAid, eventually get Medicare and have to do something to get medical coverage in between. The usual place to get info about this is your local welfare office ( which the state office where I work). Good luck.
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thanks for the advice
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It may take more than a day. It is worth it to legally preserve your benefits. Be calm. Try not to hang up on them. Lol. Make an appointment to go in to Social
Security, or, when phoning, ask to speak to their supervisor or an expert.
Deep breaths.....this is the government you are working with, after all. Try not to change the system on these calls, or contacts, focus on your benefits available now, that legally exist within the current system guidelines. imo.
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To preserve the Medi-Cal portion of your Medicaid-if that is what they are taking away....
1) Receipts for any unpaid medical expenses can equalize the qualifications required for Medi-Cal, and tip the balance back in your favor.
2) Always file a timely appeal whenever the gov't. is taking away a benefit. You don't have to know what you are doing at the time of filing the appeal, because they will call you and be required to give your case a closer look. imo.
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thank you you did clear up a few things i will spend a day lol on the phone with ssa and
medicaid
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If you are talking to the IRS about filling out a form to receive the (EIC) earned income credit, then follow those instructions.

You say they are taking something away? Could that be the SSI portion of your income, because you had too much income (according to their guidelines)? However, you will still receive SSDI?

I believe this case is way beyond my limited knowledge.
Ask your case worker or an expert at Social Security

You need to provide much more information, including your age, whether you are currently on Medicare, Medi-Cal
( which IS Medicaid), or just Medicare, or just Medi-Cal.

Then, could you re-phrase your question here to clarify just what it is you are asking?

Maybe someone who is an expert on here can answer once you provide more information.
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so you automatically qualify
but they take medicaid away
once you get disability payments worked 37 years and that is ridiculous
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but i was told not to include it in my MAGI its confusing
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If one qualifies for SSI or SSDI, it is my understanding that automatically qualifies one for Medicaid. You may need to fill out some forms.
If one receives money from these programs (SSI and SSDI),
then YES, this is your income. It counts as INCOME.

Does that answer your question?

Social Security can answer any specific questions pertaining to your case.
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