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I cared my mom many years and she said I don't have to pay rent. My sister din't ask me for rent money for 3 months but now she got an attorney and wants me out of my moms house at the end of the month or she will evict me.
Is this legal? My mother and i had a verbal agreement.

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Similar situation - took care of mom for 20+ years, sold my own home and moved in with mom for more than 4 years, eventually had to give up work to stay home to care for mom. As soon as mom started showing signs of dementia, sister swooped in, changed the POA under dubious circumstances, placed wedges between the 4 siblings, manipulated mom and took over her medical care and began a campaign of neglect. I moved out, but maintained a room at mom's home and continued to check in and stay overnight from time to time. Eventually part time and then full time caregivers we brought in. None of it has worked out. Now that mom is just about dead, sis has filed for conservatorship and has asked the court for permission to "evict" me. She already has a realtor, too. She found out about the 2-year child caregiver rule and just wants to make sure mom's house pays for her kids outrageous student loan debts. This sort of thing is always motivated by money - either to generate "income" to actually pay for care, or to "steal" it for themselves. Seems it works out that it's about a 50/50 split between the neglecting thieves and the altruistic caregiver just trying to pay for the best care available. Bottom line - the POA, and even more so, a guardian or conservator, can really screw you up, if you're the one doing the care and living in your parent's home. From personal experience, I would never advise a child to take on that role without that power or authority, and then cover your butt by documenting every single little thing you do and every penny you spend. And put your agreement in writing and have it notarized. Don't make the foolish mistakes I and the original poster have made -- you will be really, really sorry.
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Alas, a POA or guardian can upset any understanding about the intentions of the house. It doesn't seem right, but a POA or guardian can sell a property out from under an intended heir after a parent becomes incapacitated. They can also do things like charge rent or forcing eviction. It can take a while to accomplish these things if a person lives in a residence, but it can be done.
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Well if mom is in a nursing home on Medicaid, there is a waiver for children who gave care for two or more years to remain in the home. BUT they have to pay the taxes, mortgage, utilities and upkeep on their own. So are you paying for those?
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I read in your profile that your mother is in a nursing home. Is you sister wanting to sell the house to help cover expenses?
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I'm afraid you are going to have to find another place to live.

Who is going to be taking care of Mom?
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The Guardian can legally do this, but why would she want to if you are caring for mom?
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