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If it is a burial policy verses being a life insurance policy can any member of the family contact them along with a copy of the death certificate? And if the policy is written out to be paid to one specific person then will they share that information with everyone? As an example, If a POA takes out a burial policy on a parent can they make themselves the beneficiary or does it go to a funeral home? If they do make themselves the beneficiary can the other sibling do anything about it?
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The insurance company will only share information with the policy owner or beneficiary. If you were not contacted, you are not on the policy.
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I agree with Debralee. If your mother passes and you know the name of the insurance company then you simply need to mail a copy of the death certificate to the insurance company and the check will be issued to the beneficiary. That is how it worked with my father.
And, Debralee is also correct that the DPOA does not have to supply information to other siblings. I only did it because my sister is the other DPOA and I needed a signature from her. Give and take.
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If there is named beneficiaries on a life insurance policy, all that is needed is a certified death certificate to be issued to the insurance company and the proceeds will go directly to the beneficiary/beneficiaries stated on the policy. It does not have to be an executor to submit the death certificate. If no beneficiaries were listed then it goes to probate and the the executor of the estate handles the necessary paperwork. POA ends in death. Not sure this answered your question, but this is how it would work upon death. If your mother is still alive, the POA does not have to provide financial information to family members. Hopefully the POA is doing right by your mother.
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Ask your sister for the information. I am DPOA for my mom and my sister asked me for detailed information on my mom's finances. We share the DPOA and I had asked her to sign the caregiver agreement between my mother and myself...I can't very well get into an agreement with myself. Anyway....she balked and wanted to get details on where my mother's money was going and would go. I gave her a detailed spreadsheet. I have nothing to hide.
Maybe you could ask your sister who the beneficiary is and "what if" something were to happen to her, who would take over that information. That was what my sister did and I provided the information.
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You give no information in your profile therefore I can't tell if this is a hypothetical question. If your mom has actually passed away, condolences on your loss.

Your question would lead one to believe that you have a contentious relationship with your sister who is being secretive about your mother's finances? Do you know the name of the life insurance company that carries your mother's policy? Are you trying to find out who is the beneficiary? They probably won't give you information just because you ask. You may be able to discover the named beneficiary if you have reason to believe you might be involved and your present a death certificate.

Powers of attorney expire upon someone's death. After a person passes away, if there is a trust, it is the trustees who is responsible. If there is only a will, it is the executor. Who has your mom name for these functions?
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A POA ends at the death of the person. Then the executor of the will takes over. The life insurance company will have the names of the beneficiaries. I would check with the executor to see if you can get a copy of any pertinent documents that you should have or at least get the name of the insurance company and policy number if you can.
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The PoA generally goes away at the time of death. At that point in time the issue would be who is the executor of the will or Trustee of the trust. That would be the party to look to for paperwork related to disposition of assets. There is no requirement that someone share their will and or final instructions with potential beneficiaries prior to their death. Having said that, families often face challenges over who gets what upon the death of a loved one. The more open and up-front that process, the more these might be able to avoided.
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