Follow
Share

They are both at least 74 years old and have mobility and health problems. Their daughter lives in the house with them and helps them with food, bills, cleaning all daily living stuff. She works 4 days a week. Is her income counted as part of their assets? Does her income count as part of their income? They would both have to be in Nursing home or Assisted living with out her help.

Find Care & Housing
I’m with Worried & GuestShoppe that your SIL is misinformed.

Medicaid is a huge, HUGE program run uniquely by each state but within overall federal guidelines. Everything from those Happy Teeth vans that go to schools under CHIP, to loaning breast pumps under WIC, to LTC skilled nursing care in a NH. One thing they all have in common is that all are “at need” programs. So the applicant must show to be “at need” both medically AND financially for the exact particulars of the specific Medicaid program he or she or they actually have filed for Medicaid.

if he, or she or they were determined to be ineligible, then state Medicaid program or the outside contractor - who is managing that specific program - will send a letter as to why they are ineligible. They can appeal the disapproval but it has to be within whatever tight timeframe to do an appeal.

so did they actually file for a program & get a ineligible letter? If so they and whomever is thier DPOA need to get that letter and go to their Area on Aging Office to get clarification as to what exactly it means
BUT
If is this more that somebody told them they had too too much $ (if this is it, unless they know their exact details on the couples income AND assets it all nonsense & fear speak), or told them they had too too expensive of a home, or had a adult child living with them that disqualifies them or too, too much of something else.... whether or not it will matter will depend on the source of the income AND type of asset AND knowing the rules for the specific Medicaid program for your state (like gifting of funds or commingling of accounts).
Otherwise is all just conjecture.

as others have said, for couples Medicaid, really an elder law attorney- especially one CELA level- will be worthwhile for them to have.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to igloo572
Report

They should see Elder law Atty..& have them fight w Medicaid...hugs 🤗
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to CaregiverL
Report

If parents are trying for health insurance, the daughter living and helping out may effect it. They do ask who is living with you.

For NH care 1k is well under the cap for Medicaid. The house does not count as income unless its worth a lot. I can't believe together they only get 1000. My DH worked blue collar and the highest he made, in later years was 50k. I worked full and p/t jobs, the highest about 30k. Together we get about 2300.

I think you may need to call Medicaid and run this by a caseworker. Doesn't sound right.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report
worriedinCali Oct 18, 2019
The daughters income and helping out has nothing to do with Medicaid health insurance eligibility. Her living with them does not affect that.
(1)
Report
See 2 more replies
Hibiscus, what state do these folks live in? If NC, the Medicaid rules are very complicated. I can understand why they are confused.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to anonymous123913
Report

They likely can't get community Medicaid but it has nothing to do with the daughter or her income. The home ownership is what prevents community Medicaid. Long Term Care Medicaid, ( the type you need for a nursing home) on the other hand would be available if they medically need it, regardless of whether they own a home or not. They need to consult an elder specialist or attorney to help prepare in the event they would need nursing home care. The Daughter's income has nothing to do with any approval or denial of Medicaid. They really need to have an attorney take care of preparations in case they need nursing home care.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to mstrbill
Report
worriedinCali Oct 18, 2019
Home ownership doesn’t make them ineligible for community Medicaid either. Home ownership would only be an issue if they want LTC medicaid and their home equity is $572,000 or more. Owning a home in itself does not make them ineligible. For community Medicaid, it’s income and resources that determine eligibility. Home value is not counted https://medicaid.ncdhhs.gov/medicaid/get-started/learn-if-you-are-eligible-medicaid-or-health-choice/medicaid-income-and
(3)
Report
Unless the parents gifted money, have a house with value above the state’s maximum, don’t qualify under care needs, or don’t meet that state’s qualifications as resident or citizen. I agree With worried that SIL may not have gotten all the facts for disqualification. It’s worth checking the document that stated reasonS they didn’t qualify.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Guestshopadmin
Report

Your SILs income and assets don’t count toward her parents Medicaid eligibility. Sounds like she is either confused or misinformed. If her parents total monthly income is $1000, then they qualify for Medicaid. Owning a home doesn’t make them ineligible either
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to worriedinCali
Report

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter