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It's a long story but she is currently in WY with no family in a nursing home. We will be moving her to a facility here in WI closer to her kids, grandkids, siblings, etc. I'm wondering if it's easier to fly her home, although I don't think a direct flight is available, or drive her straight to WI, a 17 hour drive. She doesn't sit still, constantly roams the halls where she is now and has sundowners

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We have an attorney in WY helping us with all the legalities of the move. Yes, if she acted up at the airport that would not be good. Thank you for pointing that out. We will probably end up driving her back. We're thinking 3 adults plus my sister. We're hoping her Dr will have some suggestions before we leave. I was just thinking the faster the better! Wish I could click my heels!
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NO you do not fly her anywhere. Never put someone with dementia on an airplane. Besides the issue of behavior, the cabin air pressure is not as good as being on the ground and serious harm may result.
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That's a tough call. There are lots of factors. First of all, moving someone from one state to another may involve insurance issues and Medicaid issues, if she is receiving Medicaid. Do you know if she is? If so, that's a whole other issue to consider, since you would need to apply her in the new state. And there may be residency issues. Plus, what if there is gap period.

I've seen a couple of threads around here where someone had an issue similar to yours about transporting someone with dementia a great distance. With advanced dementia, a medical transport might be better than a commercial flight. Plus, having a layover or transferring sounds like a nightmare with a dementia patient. Are there available funds for a private transport?

How is she functioning right now? My concerns would be that she would not do well with the crowds, strange people, strange noises, people touching her at security, turbulence, etc. What if she becomes frightened, panicked and unmanageable on the plane? It could get risky, since, airlines may not accommodate someone who's acting in a way they consider unsafe. Then what? 

Have you spoken with the staff who work with her everyday? I'd ask what they think about air travel for her. I'd ask how they find her when they transport her somewhere in the car. 

Driving may also prove a challenge. Maybe, someone who has done that will chime in here and describe their experiences. I'd keep in mind that everyone is different though.
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