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My sister is abusing her power of attorning and refuses to tell, is my sister breaking the law? she will not tell me where she is, she is crazy . me and my mom have been living together for 45 years or so. we cannot live if we cannot see each other.she sees me when i was in the hospital and when she was.
my mom is 84 and she still has her wits and memory, she is healthy physically and has just a little dementia. can anyone help me find her please, it has been 6 months now and my sister is driving me crazy. she said to ask the doctor and they would not tell me anything either. i live in the collingwood area,

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Myaunt posted on Sept. 22, 2015 on this same issue:

https://www.agingcare.com/questions/power-of-attorney-prevent-me-from-visiting-dying-mother-in-Law-159840.htm?cpage=5 ( last post on that page ), which I've copied here so the fuller story is available:

"my sister is poa for my mom, my mom is in a nursing home long term care i think.
my sister is vindictive, mean, nasty, psychotic,and has been for years abusing her poa power,she thrives on power she is crazy.she told me a couple of times that she is going to make sure in all her power that i do not get any money from my mother. my mother said yes tony she wants all of my money. so now my mom has dementia and my sister drove my mom into a nursing home and now is not telling me where my mom is or where she does not answer phone calls, i have no way of communicating with her. i have no restraining order against me.me and my mom have been living and seeing each other happily for over 50 years, phoning each other too every day.she is jealous of me because she knows how much my mom hates her for not being a part of my family for 40 years so now my mom wants to give me her money or split it but my sister wants all of her money and house. leaving me with nothing. yes, my mom was under deress when she signed her over to poa, now my mom wants me to be poa or split the poa and my sister will not even agree to that, so how can i see my mom. "

There are some questions that suggest there's more going on in this situation than has been posted.

How did your sister spirit away your mother when the two of you were living together? And why? Obviously there are some strong feelings between you and your sister. If the source of this hasn't been resolved, it might be that the issue of seeing your mother hasn't either.

Why was your mother under duress when she signed the POA appointing your sister? If she had dementia and was coerced and didn't understand what she was executing, the POA probably isn't valid.

This post reminds me of another that was almost identical. The poster was male, said his mother had been kidnapped by a relative. Turns out the poster had been in prison. And if I recall correctly, the intervening relative was protecting the mother.

I'm not saying this is the situation, but I did a few searches and found this apparently isn't unusual. These hits address similar situations. Perhaps some of the answers there may be of help, but I still think as well as agree with Maggie that APS is a good place to start, along with the local police department.

https://www.agingcare.com/search.aspx?searchterm=mother+kidnapped+by+reltaive

So, can you tell us a little bit more about why your sister would do what she's done, how it happened, and what the police said if you contacted them?

I'm sure the police could do some searches, including by tracing your mother's finances, to determine where she's staying. Assuming your mother gets SS, and assuming it's either banked or paid directly to a nursing home or similar facility, law enforcement could access those records.



You wrote in that post that your sister is named in your mother's Durable (?) POA.
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Call Adult Protective Services. Tell them that you fear for moms safety and your sister will not tell you where she is. One has to wonder how families get so messed up . . . And how it is that a little old lady ends up in the middle of it.
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