Follow
Share

Dad had a stoke about two months ago today, before that he had small signs of dementia and w/the stoke he's gotten worst cognitively. My question is how do you keep him from messing up his TV signal and if there are simple ways for him to use the remote control. He has removed cables and messing up the other TV's in the house. We show him to remind him but he forgets, he loves the Turner Classic Movie channel and all sports channel but when I come and visit there is no signal at home on his TV. He's wakes up all hours of the night and w/o TV on he moves around the house waking MOm and brother. Do you sugguest a Flat screen TV hanging from the wall would keep him from messing with cables. Are there small remotes that are simple to use?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
I'm wondering if digital tv's will reset themselves no matter what. I replaced her microwave with an old school dial model. She has macular degeneration, so when things go into reset mode she can't see the instructions.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Holly, it's only the cable connection that causes the reset. I unplug my computer and tv when not in use, but I leave the cable connection plugged in to avoid reset.

Perhaps the cable company could provide some statistics on the use of electricity when the connection is left on.

I do understand your friend's practice though. We were raised very frugally, something for which I'm appreciative now.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

holly, probably the only way to get around not having the TV resetting itself, was for your friend not to have cable on her TV. The resetting also happens when the power go out for a minute or two.

I can understand your friend not having things plugged in when not in use because so many items today are always "on" when not in use. And that draws power. TV's are a big draw on the meter.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

My Senior freind likes to unplug anything that is not in use. I'd like to get her a tv that doesn't reset every time she does it. Anyone know of one like that. I know of simple remotes, but she doesn't like things plugged in when they are not in use.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Some relatives of mine have had this problem too. They would press the wrong button, whether because it was dark, they were confused, whatever the case may be. Looking at some of these remotes, unfortunately, sometimes it can be hard to program some of these remotes controls to their TV.

I came across a new invention recently called Button Blocker. It's not a remote- but rather, it's a removable cover that you can put onto the remote, and it covers all but the most necessary buttons (uncovered buttons include power, guide, volume).

It's easy enough to use too- snaps on and off. What's also cool is that it glows in the dark. Right now you can order off of their website- just google Button Blocker remote control cover.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

And the Flipper is also on Amazon.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Google: "Doro HandleEasy Universal Remote Control" for an easy remote with very few buttons. It's available on Amazon.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

They have the Jitter Bug Cell Phone. Why cant someone invent the Jitter Bug TV Remote? Power on/off ; Volume-up/down: Channel-up/down., one button that says Cable, Satellite, Antenna-(tv). But do really need that much? I say, just stick with TV Stations, there's enough to watch. Then get a bet ole plug in radio.. Keep entertainment easy in the house. Get them to walk around a bit, maybe, mingle at the local church for some bingo, or church groupl, learn a new song & dance. , Get old much from their era, Sinatra, Big band music,...Happy music.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

The Flipper worked great with our TV. However, my mom just moved into an Assisted Living and the Flipper is not compatible with the cable box according to the Flippers website. Cisco merged or bought Scienftic Atlantic.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I bought my cousin a very basic remote last year. I ordered it online. Maybe from Amazon. I can't recall the name of it now, but I got the name from this site. There should be an old thread around here about it.

This remote is awesome. It only has features for on/off, channel up/down, volume up/down and mute. I'll post back if I can find the name of it. It looks like some others have listed some good ones too.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

With the Flipper to can do a Lock Code so the settings can't get changed.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

My mom also has issues with moving the cables and such around. She started doing this when experiencing her delusional episodes. She would unplug the cable box, TV, take the batteries out of the remote etc. And then call me, when she was living in another state, because she couldn't turn her TV on. SMH. She's in AL near me now, and when I go there I still see the cables out of whack. We bought her a flat screen and the type of stand that allows the TV to be mounted to it, for fear of her knocking it over. It isn't easy...
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

There's a very good remote control for seniors called Flipper. It has big numbers and simple numbers, plus channel and volume control. None of those extra buttons. You can find them on Amazon. If he has cable, be sure to get the remote control that operates two devices.

Now, about fidgeting with the cables, I don't know. A remote control won't help you with that.

My mother often gets her TV and cable box out of sync, even with the simple remote control. She does this by pointing the remote in the wrong direction when she turns the TV off or on. The flipper has an easy way to get them back in sync, but someone with advanced dementia may have a harder time with it. I wish they would stop having separate cable boxes, but it is apparently easier in this HD age.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

One suggestion is instead of using a remote, use the controls that are on the TV itself... yep, there are still controls where you walk up to the TV to turn it on/off, change the volume, change the channels.... not easy to find as in today's world heaven forbid anything is labeled large enough on a TV to see, it might ruin the sleek design of the TV itself :P

The Sony I have has actual buttons on the right side of the TV for On/Off, Volume, Channels.... something an elder can relate to. My Samsung has such controls on the front which are used by "touch", but those labels are tiny to see.

Ok, I understand using the channel changer button could be exhausting if one wanted channel 500 and the TV is currently set on channel 4, that's a lot of button pushing :(
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I tried placing tape over the buttons my mom shouldn't touch. That seemed to work for her.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My tv remote control has so many buttons on it that I don't need and that I don't use. Maybe you could get some black fingernail polish and brush it over the buttons on the remote that he doesn't use and that aren't necessary for him to watch tv. This won't help his fiddling with the cables but it might help him from pressing all kinds of buttons on the remote.

A flat screen may help but it would have to be placed very high as there are buttons on the side of the screen that he can get to and push.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Some time ago this question came up before. I recall there was a remote control that had few exposed buttons, and then behind a flip door was the rest of them. If you do a search on this site, you might find the post. Or at least a google search. I know we have used a large "I" (letter eye) shaped remote control that had large, easy to read buttons. There are also simple 6 button controls. ON-OFF and volume and channel up and down. No number buttons. One thing we have found helpful is with DirecTV, we can set up a preprogrammed favorites list that allows up to choose the few channels that Mom actually cares about. That way she can scroll through and not have to deal with all the sports and shopping channels for example. Well, these days I have to do it for her, but used to she could.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

This is a tough one because the cable remotes have so many functions.

I'm wondering if you could prepare simple instructions for him and tape them to the remote.

I think a flat screen that's not accessible would at least prevent him from changing the cable configuration, assuming that he wouldn't get up on a stool or chair or something to access them.

You might also call the cable supplier and find out if there's a way to disable all functions except for the channels he likes - not sure it's possible, but it's worth a try.

Wouldn't you think that something in such widespread use as a cable remote would have adaptations for people with challenges?
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Maybe try a universal remote. I'm not sure, but I don't think it would have all the same working functions like the main remote has to turn off the signal from the cable box. Goodluck
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.