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Medicaid took 6 months last year to get around to figuring out if they would accept my fathers application and the subsequent months have had multiple incorrect income estimates that I'm still trying to get time to sort out with them. The result is the NH my father was in went unpaid and now there's a large bill and I'm trying to work with them to set up a payment plan that will hold them over until medicaid can fix their issues. The promissory not they sent to have signed lists both my Dad and my names. The exact wording is: "I [DAD'S_NAME], along with [MY_NAME] my (Attorney in Fact) do promise to pay..." It seems to me that signing that would make me a cosigner on the note. That's not something I wish to be. Originally they just had my name on there with no mention of my father, but I asked them remove me entirely, listing only my Father and they pushed back with this...thoughts?

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I'm going to give it one more round of communication with the NH to see if they'll accept a revised version that makes it clear that the debt is my fathers. So far I've been able to avoid using an attorney...but there's been much un-burying of my dad's financial mis-adventures so far. I suspect I will need to have one to get all of this sorted out :(
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I agree with CM. I'm not a lawyer but I am reading that literally as Dad and EschellonForce agree to pay. If you substitute the words "attorney in fact" for "son" you would read it that way as well.

I won't sign anything where my name appears in the body of the document. I only sign on MOM's signature line and then I include the words "attorney in fact"
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The weasels! Cross that bit out!

It should be I, [father's name], promise etc.

No mention of your name.

At the signature line, you sign it for and on behalf of [father's name], [your name] with Power of Attorney. The point being that you are doing the signing for your father, and not the promising!

And yes check the whole thing with a lawyer.
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Another thought, I'm not from the USA so I am far from an expert on Medicaid, but once your Father's application is approved it is my understanding they should be covering all the previous months since he submitted his application.
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Being in the right may not stop them from harassing you for payment. Depending on the size of the debt it may be worth it to have a lawyer go over the contract just to be sure, and then have them send a letter asking them to leave you alone.
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I always sign as POA on all his things. So I suppose as long as I sign this as POA in this I'm not actually signing as myself... Even though I'm listed as a promissor in this case I'm not 'legally' signing it as myself?
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If you signed as your dad's POA - which you did - you can not be held personally responsible for the debt.
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