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He was to be given regular food as promised. I feel lied to and forced to sign waiver since they are NOT keeping their word on giving him regular food again.

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My husband gave it a good strong try and then rejected the dysphagia diet. I support that decision. He understood the risks. If he died from aspirational pneumonia, so be it. His speech therapist went nuts, but both his behavioral neurologist and geriatrician were very supportive of his decision. Thank goodness I didn't have to deal with bureaucracy -- dear Coy lived at home with me.

My feeling is that people should be allowed to make their own decisions about such matters. They should be fully informed about potential consequences. But it should be their decisions.

DeeDee, you asked about having the waiver honored. I think that is what most of us have been addressing. If you also want to discuss the pros and cons about the dysphagia diet, you could start another thread. From the way you post is worded I assume you have made your decision and you are just looking for ways to have it honored.

Have you had any further discussion at the facility? I'd go that route first, but I wouldn't hesitate to contact the Ombudsman if you don't get satisfactory results.
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If they do it for his own safety why do they give him 5 to 6 full size pills to swallow? Pills are much harder to get down than food which they are continuing to refuse him.
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The fastest way to kill a patient is to give regular food when he needs puree for a swallowing problem. Please ask the nurse to explain this in detail . Most patients are not pleased by pureed foods, but it is done for their own safety.
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I try really hard to work with all the people caring for my parents
whenever possible. Not always easy, but I hate to antagonize
the people I depend on. I take a little time to think about it
before I deal with these situations.
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sometimes the SW's the problem
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Debdaughter, in every situation where my mom's care was compromised in some way, either in the hospital or the NH, I found that there was always miscommunication, misunderstanding and the like, rather than deliberate obstructionism. Sometimes it was MY misunderstanding of who the appropriate person to ask things of was.

In the NH, I finally solved this by funneling ALL of our requests, questions, etc, through the SW, who either gets them to the right people or tells us who to call.. Having one point of contact has helped immensely.
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Could what apply? Breakdown in communication? Getting a waiver to an action the NH does not approve? How can we help you, debdaughter?
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could this apply in another situation?
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I'd suspect a breakdown in communications rather than deliberate non-compliance with the agreement.

Babalou has good advise.

If you can't solve this problem with additional discussions, I'd contact the Ombudsman. He deserves to make his own decisions, with your support, about what he will eat.
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In my experience with both hospitals and nhs, the communication between the kitchen and the rest of the facility is often poor. Don5feel lied to; go into problem solving mode. Call the social worker in the am and say, in your sweetest voice " my husband is feeling so discouraged..i promised him that once we signed the release, he'd get regular food again, but the kitchen is still sending pureed meals. Can you help figure out where the line of communication has broken down?"

During one hospi8visit, it turned out that a special code needed to be entered into the computer system, and my mother5nurse, who was new, didn't know that. Going up a level to the unit manager solved the problem
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