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Husband has early Parkinsons and depression. He is pleased by the attention in the AL and has staff do everything that he is able to do alone or with help. For example, he is able to dress himself with minimal help, but will not if anyone offers to dress him. Now he wants to live in AL. Has said he does not want to live at home because there is no entertainment and he has to help with his activities of daily living. In several past stays in respite care, he has wanted to return home after a few weeks. He has always been indecisive. Do I keep him home with caretaking help part time or pay $84,000 a year for AL? After a few years, there will be little left for my care, should I need it. I can't find a compromise solution, and would love some input.

Ditto on consulting an elder care attorney to create a plan to protect your half. Medicaid has a "look back" of 5 years so you need to do this right away. You will need to spend a little on solid advice rather than pay a lot later when the Medicaid Grim Reaper comes looking for your unprotected assets.

Also, have you considered downsizing now as well? Who is there to help you as you age if your hubby stays in AL? How old are you and are you in decent health? You could consider being on the same care campus as your hubby but in independent living where there's lots of people like yourself and things to do. Just a thought...
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Reply to Geaton777
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He seems willing to spend all the savings the two of you have on his amusement - what do you think you should do. As he could live for 20 or more years I personally would divorce him as he thinks so little of your needs and then he can do what he likes with his split which will soon be gone on his laziness and amusements.
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Reply to TaylorUK
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AlvaDeer Aug 24, 2019
At first I laughed out loud at your suggestion, but then thought again, and it might be a dang good one. That would divide the assets at the least, and he could be where he wanted while the funds lasted. I had a friend whose wife due to a catastrophic accident was as good as dead but NOT dead and lived many years in a comatose state while he tried to raise their two sons. He had to divorce to divide assets at a point.
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If you wish to have your husband live at home as independently as possible, call a Care Conference for you and his care staff. Explain to them that your goal is to have him return home and he needs to be as independent as possible. Respectfully suggest that if the staff are doing things for him instead of encouraging him to do for himself, he will never regain his independence.

I sense you are “on the fence”, so to speak, about where he should live. By stating that there is no “entertainment” at home and he has to get his hiney in gear and do for himself, instead of being treated like the royalty he apparently thinks he is, he has indicated he wants to stay where he is. It sounds like he’s been in respite care often. Is this because you repeatedly need a break from caregiving for him? If he wants not to live at home, so be it. Consult with an attorney so he gets what he needs and you are left with enough to care for yourself. But, impress upon him that the decision he makes is permanent this time.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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Could a good adult day care and some in home care be a good compromise?

Many adult day care facilities have programs and activities similar to an AL, some even provide transportation to and from the facility so DH would have entertainment. Although the day care can be expensive too ($50-80 a day in my area), it's still a cheaper than AL, particularly if he only attends 3-4 days a week. One of the ALs in a neighboring town actually runs an adult day care unit too and offers preferential scheduling and pricing on respite stays for their day care members.

Some in home care to assist with ADLs like bathing and physical or occupational therapy (maybe on the days he doesn't attend day care) could support remaining in the home for longer too. Some of this care should be covered by Medicare and/or supplemental insurance (for the Parkinson's).
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Reply to TNtechie
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Split everything down the middle and let him use his and you do as you wish with yours.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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MargaretMcKen Aug 21, 2019
If you mean split the money, could you give more details about how to do it?
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If you feel that he will impoverish you, then you need to see an elder law attorney before it is too late. You are entitled to live in the home and keep a certain amount of assets when you apply for Medicade. Each state is different. Your husband will soon become too much to handle and he may make it to nursing home care. Protect yourself by becoming informed of your rights. Use this website for general knowlege but remember you get what you pay for.
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Reply to MACinCT
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Agree that you need to talk to an certified elder law attorney and encourage finding one who charges by the task not per question....You will spend on a fortune as well, though not as much, with daily home care. Around our parts it is a 4 hour minimum at approx $20/hr and I have learned the hard way even doing that can be tedious for the caregiver (you) because you must take care to protect valuables as well as remember to be very specific in what you want done. Many hired show zero initiative.
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Reply to gdaughter
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You can both go together.
Some are Senior Retirement homes with meals and activities, like an AL.
And are set up to accommodate caregivers, and even hospice can come in, I am told.
If dH requires caregivers, maybe a two bedroom?
Some, I am told, have a buy-in, if you have a home to sell.
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Reply to Sendhelp
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Is there an Adult Day Care facility in your area for where your husband could go for some daily activities and social contact? There would be some cost involved, but less than an AL. Adult Day Care is typically offered only during normal business hours on weekdays, but even several days a week might give your husband enough activity and attention to help him manage the boredom and depression.
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Reply to RedVanAnnie
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If you got a price of 84k for minimal care, I’d look else where. My mother’s with medication, help with dressing, cleaning, 3meals and all the snacks she can eat, toileting help , etc, more than your husband needs is under 40k a year.
They evaluate her as to needs on a bi-monthly basis and encourage independence so if your husband is envisioning servants, he’s barking up the wrong tree lol
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Reply to Jannner
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jacobsonbob Aug 24, 2019
That was my thought, too. My mother pays less than $84K for nursing home care, so that figure looks ridiculous for AL.
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