Is my mother too bad off health wise for assisted living? Should my mother go to a nursing home instead?

Follow
Share

My mom has dementia and needs to be somewhere but I'm afraid she may be too bad off health wise for just assisted. In August last year she started having spinal compression fractures from severe osteoporosis. Now 6 months later she is all hunched over and in a lot of pain. So much its hard for her to get around and all she does is lay down and sleep all the time. She's lost 30lbs since then. She has some pressure areas from lying around so much. Her backbone really sticks way out now. Forgets meds, forgets to eat and has to be forced to bathe. Aside from that she now has congestive heart failure. Just spent a week in hospital. Today she went into rehab at a nursing home. She is in so much pain. She needs help getting to the bathroom or a chair or to get out of bed. They want to try to strengthen her somewhat to keep her walking and getting around better. I like the assisted living facilities better than the nursing home environment but am concerned they may not take her with her fragile, frail state. Is she too bad off for assisted living?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
6

Answers

Show:
I would discuss it with her doctor as the facility needs the doctor's order regarding her daily needs.

Since your profile says she has Dementia, you might look at some Memory Care facilities in NC. They do have residents who have very limited mobility and it is technically Assisted Living, not NH.

Memory Care units can handle those who are fully incontinent or need complete help with toileting. even though a regular Assisted Living in NC does not do that. If there is one in your area, you might check it out. (I'm in NC too.) The thing is that if she should need daily skilled nursing care, they would not be able to keep her. They would be able to administer all her meds though, as well as bathe her, dress her, change diapers, feed by hand, etc.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Her physician will need to write the order for admit to either place so I'd let him decide which would be best. I agree with everyone else, sounds like it will be an SNF. Wouldn't want her to go into AL and then need to be moved later...too upsetting to do that.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I would speak to her "team" and ask about options and what would be best for her. Let them know that she can't live on her own and you can't give her the level of care that she now needs. Assisted living might be beyond her.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have to agree with windy. Your poor mother has so much pain to deal with along with other health issues. Especially with the congestive heart failure. My mother had CHF as well and was in a skilled nursing facility. The nurses were wonderful as she had to be closely monitored. Things can change rapidly and if they are already in SNF, proper care, comfort meds can be given immediately.
My mother eventually required hospice care while at the SNF. The CHF can go up and down frequently and pneumonia can set in more easily as well. The head nurse coordinated contact with the hospice nurses and they were quickly at the nursing home to meet with me, sign papers, and care starts immediately. They are wonderful and so experienced. I was completely satisfied with all they did for my mother. My mother had also been in the hospital and sent to rehab at nursing facility. It was an easy transition as she was then requiring 24 hour care and there was space available for her to stay. My heart goes out to you dealing with all this and difficult decisions to be made. Take care.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I think your instincts are correct. With all this stuff going on she needs skilled nursing care.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Normally before a person can move into Assisted Living, the facility will evaluate the person to see what his/her daily needs will be, and if the facility can handle those needs. I would check around and talk to the different facilities, as some may be limited and others might offer a higher level of care.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.