Should I try to do anything?

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my sister took my dad out of the home i put him in. she got him to sign a revoking order and now he is back at square one with no social contact or contact from other family members.

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AngryDaughter, first, what is your father's health like? Why is he in a care center (nursing home?) in the first place?

Is he competent to make his own decisions? (That is, has a court ever declared him incompetent? Does he have dementia or other cognitive issues?)

I take it that you had POA and now your sister does. Is that correct? Technically, POA isn't sufficient authority to determine where someone will live if the person does not want to live there. Works great to get Mom or Dad set up in a care center if they don't object. Not so good if they refuse. So... what is your dad's attitude toward being in a care center?

Is he back at his home or living with your sister? Why does this mean no social contact or contact from other family? Were other family members visiting him at the care center?

Should you try to do anything? Like getting him back to the care center?

If all he has is "general age-related decline" and he is competent to make his own decisions, I don't see what you can do. Even if you could prove "undue influence" in the change in POA, getting the POA back still wouldn't give you authority to place him where he doesn't want to be.

If you think a court would declare him incompetent (based on the signed opinions of medical doctors and other persons investigating the situation) then you can try for guardianship and you would have the authority to decide where he will live. I understand this is not inexpensive and that the outcome is uncertain when family members disagree.

I assume you did your best, probably with considerable effort, to do what you consider right for your dad. I can certainly understand your anger at your sister's interference. But what you can do depends greatly on your father's competency status.

(I am not a lawyer. I'm just explaining my understanding of POA and guardianship.)
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