Should I sign responsible party agreement? - AgingCare.com

Should I sign responsible party agreement?

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Recently moved mom to an assisted living facility. I am her POA and completed the application and signed the application agreement but not responsible party agreement because it's strongly worded indicating if I don't handle my moms finances properly then I am liable. I've applied for Medicaid because eventually my moms funds will run out. I don't feel comfortable signing and wonder if on all other documents I should go back and make certain I put poa behind my name

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Absolutely do NOT sign anything that makes you financially responsible.

This is AL? I'd suggest to carefully check to make sure that they take Medicaid for AL and that Medicaid is available for payments without a waiting list.

In general Medicaid is designed to pay for skilled nursing care and that means a NH. Now some states do a diversion program in which NH Medicaid $ is diverted to pay for the less expensive AL. Often a AL will participate in the diversion BUT for just a few beds. (Most AL is private pay or some LTC insurance). And those medicaid diversion beds often have a waiting list which is made up of residents who have been at AL and 100% private pay for a period of time usually 1 - 2 years prior. Clearly make sure what AL terms are.
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As POA you are only responsible to use your mothers funds to pay for her needs. If she is able to pay on her own, that's good, I would not sign a form saying if your mother couldn't pay-you will. this would mean you may have to use your funds to pay for your mothers needs. You can consult with an attorney, you can contact legal aid or you can contact the long term care ombudsman at the local Area Agency on Aging. They will be able to point you in the right direction.
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As POA you need to represent your mom. If she wants to be responsible financially for the ALF bills then she should sign (even an X is fine). But never ever sign anything saying you are separately responsible apart from your mom's funds.
Another question--is this a for-profit facility? If so they might evict anybody who isn't paying.
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Do not sign anything you will be responsible to pay for in the event of your mom's passing. Just wait until Medicaid kicks in, and if you are given a hard time from the nursing facility tell them you are unable to sign papers because you do not have the funds.
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With so much at stake, you might want to get professional help. If you aren't able to afford your own attorney, try Maryland Legal Aid Bureau: http://www.mdlab.org/
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NOOOOO WAY! NO HOW! and don't allow them to tell you that you have to...
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Read you copy of any and all POA's

I use email to record dialogs.

Personally I will direct a NH to our elder affairs attorney to handle any Nursing Home admission should this be necessary

My non legal advice is never ever sign taking on someone else s liabilities.

Quoting Attorney at law Kevin P. Keane:
"agreements not reduced to writing, are NOT worth the paper they
ain't written on."

Discussion groups are fine for seeking advice in general terms but don't take answers as being correct.
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Well, as POA she is already liable to properly manage the finances. My husband signed everything with POA after his name and I signed the Advanced Directives with HCP after my name.
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NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Drop the pen!!!!

Do not sign anything that says you are responsible for payment if your mom can't pay.

Don't put "POA" after your signature. Sign your mom in but that's it.

Your mom could pass away while waiting for Medicaid to come through and you could be on the hook for thousands and thousands of dollars to the assisted living. This is just one possible example of the mess you could be in if you sign as a responsible party.

No one needs to sign as a responsible party except your mom. Your signature is not needed so don't let them tell you anything different.
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