Should I get second opinion? - AgingCare.com

Should I get second opinion?

Follow
Share

My 81yo MIL was diagnosed with advanced dementia based on memory testing and talking with the geriatric doctor back in November. Since then we have had blood work and CT done, and the results were what they expected them to be. The Dr said that based on the information I provided, and her 1on1 with MIL, that she believes that she might have some undiagnosed mental issues as well that have contributed to the dementia. MIL was a very free spirited person in the 60s/70s/80s, a very heavy beer drinker, and at the very least Marijuana was used. She is not on any medications besides daily vitamins and extra vitamin D. She is ambulatory and in control of her bodily functions, just has issues remembering things. She has had several memory tests. We began trying to get her into Compass Research to help pay for her medical needs. In June at the ALZ Foundation she scored a 12, at the Dr's office in November an 8, 1 week later at the ALZ foundation a 5.(she did not qualify for the study).... my issue is...
1. Is the diagnosis correct?
2. Should she see a psychiatric Dr? IMO she has compulsive tendancies, possible depression or anxiety, but whenever she is around people she has to be the center of attention and is very excited and happy. It IRRITATES me that the medical professionals and everyone else laugh with her and tell her how cute she is, and how much fun she is.
3. How do I convince Dr's that she is being manipulative, and seeking attention.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
8

Answers

Show:
Elders with dementia are SO good at rising to the occasion, and fooling other relatives and people in short-term visits (even a 2-day visit). They can also be very different with different care-givers. Writing it out with examples, and seeing a doc on your own before or after her visit, might help. So would a film. I am thinking nanny-cam. Yes, geriatric psych meds and treatment can help.
Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

once , on a hepc treatment i was diagnosed with mania and paranoid delusions . i instantly DEMANDED a second opinion so the told me i was ugly too .
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

BPD
Is it bipolar disorder?

M88
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Some if us have a senior LO with mental health issues and a dementia. My mother is one of them. She was diagnosed with BPD at age 96 and diagnosed with dementia age 101 when the BPD was confirmed. The evaluations were done in a geriatric psychiatric hospital under the guidance of a geriatric psychiatrist. She is treated with an antipsychotic for paranoia that came with the dementia and an antidepressant. Both meds have helped a lot.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Thank you for the insight. I was questioning if they actually had done thorough testing as I see people on here saying different types of dementia, and if with the suspect of underlying mental issues, would someone scoring so low on memory testing and not remembering a lot of things be able to actually get psychiatric help. I guess I was wondering if other people had the same issues with behavior from their loved ones.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I'm with Jeane. I'm very confused about what you are seeking clarification about. Are you questioning the inconsistencies of her scores in the three different settings? Was the same assessment given each time? Are you feeling as though she is faking symptoms of dementia?

I a big fan af geriatric psychiatry. If you think mil has underlying depression and anxiety, seeing a psychiatrist might be a good place to get her treatment for those issues. You would not so much be seeking a second opinion as you would be seeking treatment for issues that were pointed out to you by another doctor. Sort of like if you went to the cardiologist with chest pain, which was discovered to be caused by a gastric issue. Going to a GI doctor to sek treatment would not be a second opinion, it would be a referral.

Be clear about this when you make an appointment because second opinions are coded and billed differently.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

A second opinion might reassure you.

It sounds like the evaluations are thorough right where Mom is.

I'm not sure what part of the diagnosis you are questioning? If a second opinion were different, what would you expect that to be?

Mom has been diagnosed with advanced dementia. The only positive confirmation of that would be a brain autopsy. But the tests she has had sound like the best science can do before she dies. Do you question that she has dementia? Has anyone suggested what kind of dementia she probably has?

The geriatrician suspects Mom has some undiagnosed mental health issues, in addition to dementia. It sounds like you've noticed this, too. Is this the part of the diagnosis you are questioning?

As to your questions ...
1) We certainly couldn't tell you if the diagnosis is correct. After she dies an examination of the brain could confirm or refute the diagnosis. Different tests by different professionals might suggest other explanations for her cognitive decline. I doubt it, but you could ask for a second opinion.

2) Should she see a psychiatrist? That may be a way to get more specific ideas of what the undiagnosed mental illness issues are. Ask her doctor for a referral.

You think your mother is desperate for attention. And you are irritated that people give her attention. I'm puzzled. Why does it bother you that your mother enjoys her funny antics, and other people do, too?

30 How do you convince the medical professionals that she is manipulative? I really doubt that is necessary. This isn't their first rodeo. They can see the signs of manipulation as well as you can. So what? This mentally ill elderly woman with dementia is manipulative in "cute" and "funny" ways. And? Many persons in that condition are manipulative in mean and cruel ways. I'll bet it is refreshing to see someone on the happy end of the scale.

I'm not sure what you are questioning about this very through round of testing and the conclusions from them, but if a second opinion and/or consulting a psychiatrist would give you some peace, go for it.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Take a video of how she really is, and show it to doctors. I would.

M88
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions