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My wife has the POA for her parents and her mother recenctly passed away and her father is in a home. My wife manages all their accounts and bills etc...should she be paid for this service?

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I compensate my nephew and his dad. My nephew is POA (health). My nephew has a 90 minute drive, one way, to check on my mother. I am out of state. After my mother's death, I plan to compensate him better.

My husband is my Mother's POA and it is a full time job, at least for the first 2 months. He is well compensated, but his mother is quite coherent.

Personally, I would never agree to be POA. It is just too time consuming. An attorney would be getting paid, for certain. A family should find a way to compensate the POA.
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If the DPOA instrument states there can be no compensation for the responsibilities, then you can't. If there is no mention of compensation then it depends on the state. If it does allow for compensation then you can be paid.
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POA curious123.... I found this posted by a PA attorney..... like I said not sure what the laws are state to state.
7. You have the right to reasonable compensation for your services. If you decide to claim compensation, you should be sure to maintain careful records indicating how much you have been paid and the documentation that justifies such compensation.
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My husband does not take payment for being the POA for his mother. However, he was told by her lawyer he could. Not sure if that is correct info or not. Lawyers can get paid for being someone's POA. Not sure if the laws are different state to state either.
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Hi there, I'm the POA for my mother, and it states in there that I do NOT receive compensation for that service. Also, my father passed away in 2012, so I'm just dealing with her paperwork..it also states under Successor Agent "If any Agent named by me shall die....etc...", it was written in there, "Agent not to gain compensation". I'm in Florida, I'm not sure how other states handle it.
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NO the law specifically states the Power of Attorney can receive no benefit as this would be a conflict of interest. If she writes a check to herself or her spouse she would be viewed in a bad light by any judge.
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