Should an elderly woman under hospice care pay past due property taxes?

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I'm a caretaker for a 93 year old woman who has been bed bound and almost vegetative for 10+ years. I've been caring for her for the past 3.5 years. My dad is her POA and medical proxy. I posted in the caregiver burnout thread yesterday explaining the basics of my life.
I have a current situation that has to be decided in the next few weeks.
About 8 years ago, he had to get a reverse mortgage for her care since she needs 24 hour help. That money was exhausted and now she's on Medicaid. In 2013, he cashed out the last of her stocks, when he filed the 2014 taxes the capital gains made her ineligible for the senior citizen property tax credit. He wasn't aware of the income limits and thought a senior credit was based on age only. So the 2015 property and school taxes were 9k instead of 4K. Obviously, the tax people don't care and it's his ignorance so it is what it is. They won't accept partial payment so it hasn't been paid. After October 1, a lien will be placed on the house. The current balance is 10k, he has 6k. I'm able to loan her/him (if she passed) the rest. I'm not worried about getting repaid. My dad would pay me back for sure. The only thing I'm wondering is if we should or shouldn't pay it? Due to her health, it's really impossible to know if she's going to live 6 months or 3+ years. I felt like we should pay since the lien will likely be reported to the mortgage company and put her in default. It would be terrible to be put out in the winter, etcetera. However, I would also feel awful if she did pass in the next 6-9 months and my dad had to repay me for no house. I guess I'm asking if anyone knows how to best proceed? I've never known anyone who had a RM or unpaid taxes so I have no frame of reference except what I've read up on. Has anyone had a relative in this situation and/or passed away with unpaid taxes and a RM. It's champion mortgage iirc.
Nasmir, please don't reply. Thanks

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What you have to understand is that she had a massive stroke 10 years ago and upon release from the rehab hospital, the dr said she would die within a year. The "within the next year" diagnosis has been happening since then. My dad has done more than anyone could expect especially when he's not even a relative (she has no family). She outlived close to a million dollars for the home and property care. My dad is doing all this from the heart. He's not going to get anything and he has given up holidays, vacations, quality of life to keep his word. So just because I'm the one on here asking questions doesn't mean anything, he's not into computers or stuff like this. He is doing his best and let the bill go because he felt her immediate needs and limited time were more important but obviously, the Drs were wrong again and the situation has changed. Anyway, the issue is over and the bill is being paid tomorrow. Thanks for those who gave helpful advice. I really appreciate it ! :)
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What benefit would selling the house have since she's still alive? She will get nothing from the sale since the house has lost value. She is broke and the look back period would have a penalty period preventing a quick move to NH. Furthermore, RM companies have a deal with the government so they are going to get the money back even if the property is worth $10. Like I explained, she got a large bill for one year due to a mistake, she's been "near death" for a year so when the bill came and it was unable to be fixed, my dad just felt like she doesn't have the money and her time is short but a year later she's still here and there is a lien coming. I stated in my post above yours why calling a predatory RM company isn't a good idea at this point. Therefore, the bill will be paid. Advising the sale of the house and the moving of a 93 yo severely damaged and incapacitated woman during winter in New York might be the worst advice ever.
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Just a clarification...liens must be paid before a purchaser takes title at a closing. Any title work for a potential purchase will reflect existing liens as well as requirements for addressing those liens.

In my commercial and personal real estate experience, purchasers were not responsible for liens.

Purchase agreements also typically have standard provisions requiring that the seller provide title free of liens, but subject to accepted "building and use restrictions and easements of record", as the standard language states. These are beneficial easements and transfer with the land. Tax liens do not.
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You have mixed up a lot of situations here. You are not the woman's POA and not responsible for making her decisions, it seems like you are doing that on behalf of your dad. So really, you're an interested party with no real interest.

Tax liens are going to get paid sooner or later, by her, the bank or the new buyer. The bank already knows they are in default, but if what you say is correct, that the house has lost so much value, they know they are better off as long as she keeps the house. If the tax authority takes the house and she is unable to pay the loan, the bank will be the default owner, it will go into foreclosure, and the bank will own it and try to resell it via auction or for whatever they can get for it to cover their own investment and that of the tax authority. This happens everyday everywhere. People are unable to pay their debts, and the bank takes the property. It is an unfortunate ending to a long life, but it is what happens.

A meeting with the mortgage company is long overdue, and your dad should work with them to try and prevent foreclosure by selling the property now for as much as possible, to cover the RM and debt. If it can't be sold for at least that much, it will go to foreclosure and it will be the bank's problem.
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I researched the RM company she has and worst case is immediate foreclosure and best case is they pay the taxes and get repaid in 24 monthly installments with interest so like I said, no sense to tell them anything and just put the shortfall on the 0% cc, then move on. Thanks for your advice. I didn't know that my dad was doing this RM thing because it's the stupidest thing ever.
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You might want to contact the mortgage people and let them know exactly what is going on. The town just wants their money and the bank might pay it because they don't want a 328K house taken from them. They may start default proceedings but this is a very long process now. Depending on the bank and other factors it could take up to three years. During this time the bank would rather have someone in the home that they feel will take care of the property for them. They will not throw someone out until they can complete everything legally.
This is the average for a typical loan default. Considering all that the bank can be very flexible some times in order to keep their loan current.
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I think the best thing is to just pay it and move on. I don't see any benefit of letting the people who can take the house know that she's currently in a position where they can take the house. If I had some evidence from my research that they would pay and no consequences for her, ok, but I've only seen speculative stuff. Senior advisor, can you direct me to any info about this? I'd definitely read it but my gut still says to pay it before more fees are added or the lien is filed. I know the rm people are supposed to help you but the tax sale could happen while I'm waiting on the rm company's solution. I think if my dad would have called them last year when the bill came but I want to pay it before 8/15.
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Well, this probably should not remain a DIY problem/solution. Senior Advisor may be right, but whether what they decide to do about it is in your favor or not, it may be hard to say.
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But wouldn't them knowing she's delinquent put her in default and give them the chance to call in the loan? There's NO equity left in the house because property values have gone way down around here, not sure why, it's a nice area. Maybe they were overvalued before? The house was appraised at 500k at the time of the loan, now it's 328k, that's a bit less than the original rm. I know that they have government protection and will get their money but is it really a smart move to contact them? I'm just worried about a backfire.
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