Does Sepsis cause high blood sugars? - AgingCare.com

Does Sepsis cause high blood sugars?

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My husband, age 58, was admitted to ICU on Saturday morning with Sepsis, apparently brought on by a kidney stone that was blocking a duct. His temperature was between 103.3 and 104.5 for quite a long time before they were able to bring it down with 7 bags of ice on his body twice. He was on a ventilator and had an NG tube, then had emergency surgery to implant a stent to drain the infection. He talked for the first time last night and said it felt like a truck ran over him. Anyway, a nurse came into his room and said she was going to take a reading of his blood sugar. I asked why, and she said his blood sugar has been running high. Apparently they have been giving him insulin to bring it down.

My question is - are these high blood sugars a result of the Sepsis or could it be that we need to check more into the possibility that he has developed diabetes?

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Yes, sepsis or other serious infections can cause high blood sugar. What they are doing with the insulin is considered the best way of handling it now. It will help his immune system work more efficiently. I hope his blood sugar returns to normal when he is well. Diabetes can be treated, but life is so much easier without it. Fingers crossed for your husband. I hope he makes a full recovery quickly. Sepsis is scary.
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if they had to use any steroids that would sned sugars high, usually temporarily too
answers above are correct, he could have at least an underlyign tendency towars type II and needs to have it checked out when the dust settles...
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The answer is yes sepsis does cause high blood sugars in diabetics and as Pam says he is probably an undiagnosed type !!
He certainly needs to be investigated for diabetes when he gets well and it is possible that he may be controlled with diet and exercise or with pills and no longer need the insulin. I expect the hospital will refer him to a specialist upon discharge. I am assuming he is also overweight so it would be good if he looses some of that. He has had a very serious illness and expect him to be off work for some weeks so be prepared for that.
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Diabetics are more at risk for kidney stones. I tend to believe he was a Type II (non-insulin dependent) diabetic for quite some time and either didn't know it or did not discuss it with his MD.
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