Can seniors prepay a personal caregiver agreeent thus making them Medicaid eligible? - AgingCare.com

Can seniors prepay a personal caregiver agreeent thus making them Medicaid eligible?

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Personal caregiver agreement and Medicaid
Is a lawyer needed or an accountant?

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The answer depends on what state you are in. Some states recognize lump-sum pre-paid Personal Care Contracts, while other states require the care be paid for by ongoing payments only. If the state allows pre-paid lump-sum payments, then all that money will be deemed in exchange for future services to be rendered, thus will not be deemed a penalty-causing gift, for Medicaid eligibility purposes.
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NO pre-pay. Spend down the assets on actual care and don't try to hide the assets. Medicaid knows all the tricks that families try to pull. Pull a stunt like that and you will be sorry. Maybe even in jail
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It is called a Life Care Contract. Some states recognize it and others do not. You need to consult an elder law attorney and find out what your particular states laws are for Medicaid.
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I do believe you need to ACTUALLY do the work before getting paid. But to be legal, ask what the guidelines are with Medicaid.
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Yes. ElderCare Lawyer sets it all up for about $4500 to $8000.
Puts seniors money into a fund that pays the caregiver for a certain amount of hours each month that has to be done. This reduces the senior's income to the allotted amount so Medicaid kicks in. I had an Elder Care Lawyer do it, they do this all the time, is perfectly legal. I learned a alot from this site. And then made my decision on who, which lawyer I wanted to use and the price I wanted to pay.
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PinkLA is spot-on on this.

Caregiver contracts are not a DIY project. Get experienced legal.
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It is allowed in the state of massachusetts, but should be drafted by an attorney who specializes in medicaid laws.
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