My mom has dementia and has developed thrush. She won't let me brush her teeth--what can I do? - AgingCare.com

My mom has dementia and has developed thrush. She won't let me brush her teeth--what can I do?

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I HATE antibiotics. My mom has Alzheimer's for at least 7 years. I noticed this morning while cleaning her mouth her tongue and saliva was white with spots.
I tried gently brushing her teeth, but she cried "It hurts!" She is in her last stage of this demonic disease, so she can't do anything for herself.

QUESTION: What have you done when this occurred with your parent?

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Call her Dr. She may need an anti yeast drug like Nystatin. There are several different compounds they could prescribe which would help with inflammation & pain. Hope this helps.
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Yogurt is good for thrush. I used to work with people with HIV. Thrush was a common problem. Yogurt helped a lot. Her doctor may prescribe something such as Diflucan to help.
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