How do I deal with the forever changing food issues? - AgingCare.com

How do I deal with the forever changing food issues?

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Another meal to nowheresville. I make what she wants and she doesn't like the way I make it. I make it the way I made it before when she liked it and now she discovers she doesn't like it. She keeps saying "I want something that tastes good". What she liked last month, she hates this month. She'll ask for something and then say she's not up for it. I know she's elderly and sick but this is nerve racking. I wish someone else would take over and hear all the food bitches because I'm getting tire of food fights. Just thought I'd vent.

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The food weirdness continues. The pot roast she LOVED last month tasted entirely different to her this month. Same receipe, same cut of Trader Joe's pot roast, same crockpot -- same everthing. She said it was ok but tasted completely different. Poor thing. She added a twist though the other night. She can now like something in one sentence and hate it in the next so it's not even daily, weekly or monthly at this point -- she can change int he same paragraph. She liked the Trader Joe's lentil soup but 5 mins later I was informed it was just awful. I'm learning -- SLOWLY to not engage in food fights though. It is her -- and it's NOT me.
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Thanks for the feedback. I know it has to do with PD but it is truly maddening. It's like I want to please her so much to no avail. It's either too tasteless, too spicy, not tasty enough -- endless. Two weeks ago I made a pot roast that she just LOVED. I'm going to try to make it tomorrow. Watch -- she'll act like it's from Mars or something. I try not to get hurt or mad b/c I try to make her happy since her life is so limited and she's underweight. The odd thing about it is that some ppl have told me I'm a pretty good cook but you wouldn't know it if you talked to my mom. She wanted mincemeat pie for Christmas and then didn;t eat one piece. She said she was constipated so I told her just to eat the insides not the crust THe problem with life is that you have to eat. It's not like you can just say to someone, "Ok, you dont' like food anymore, ,don't eat" esp. since she's underweight. I think I'm just going to have to put my iPod on during the dinner hour. I know she'll say I'm a bitch, but I'd rather be a clueless happy bitch. :)
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Are you sure you're not talking about my mother??? LOL!!! My mom is always complaining (about pretty much everything, actually...) but food is the #1 topic - always. We go through the exact same thing in this house that you are experiencing. My mother has been diabetic for over 40 years, and yet all she ever wants to eat is carbohydrate-laden CRAP. Mac & cheese, ramen, cup o'noodles, toast, cereal, etc. etc. She has had several bouts of abdominal edema (i can't think of the proper term) due to her low protein levels - it causes the fluids to leak from the cells and tissues and she blows up like a balloon. I make meals with protein, veggies, and very little carbs - she pushes it away & claims she "can't" (i.e. WON'T) eat that. I say fine - eat your crap and then sit on the toilet all night long crapping your brains out (always happens when she's not eating properly) - but then I have to hear her bitching about THAT TOO!!! Ack!! My mother does not have dementia, so I can't even blame it on that....she's just stubborn as a mule and just as miserable. :o/
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Kedwards460, many people with Parkinson's loose their sense of smell and that in turn greatly restricts their ability to enjoy the taste of food.She may have liked something last month, when she has a little better sense of smell, and then is disappointed when it truly tastes different to her this time. I know that this is still nerve-racking for you, but I'm just pointing out that there may indeed be a physical reality behind all your mother's complaining. Food is one of her limited sources of pleasure, and, poor dear, the pleasure is decreasing. This isn't fun for her, either.

It may be that very strong tastes will overcome the loss of smell. My husband liked V-8 juice but always put Tabasco sauce in it. Grapefruit juice seemed tastier than orange juice. Crushed red pepper flakes became a stable on our table. Things like sauerkraut or jalapenos might appeal to your mother. My husband generally enjoyed sweets even after he lost the sense of smell. You might try a light sprinkling of sugar over the food, to perk up the taste buds. And serve lots of canned peaches and applesauce and pudding and ice cream -- sweets with at least a little redeeming nutritional value.

Vent away! I know how hard this is for the cook. Try not to take it personally. Blame the clumps of alpha synuclein protein in your mother's brain, and realize that she isn't doing this to annoy you. (Although that is the end result, isn't it?) So vent away!
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Vent away. Mine does the same thing. If I broil fish, she wants it fried. If I make steak, she wanted chicken. I try to cook what she likes, and she says she never has liked it. She changes stories from day to day about what she likes. So I just try to put together a nutritious meal that someone with Type II diabetes should eat and tell her she doesn't have to eat it if she doesn't want to.
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