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A person had a stroke, was in hospital and then rehab, wanted to leave rehab, told them he had a good support system, uses walker to walk, not sure he can rise into walker or sit back down after using walker without assistance, but he can walk very slowly w/walker. Can feed himself. Had stroke that affected one side of body. Has fallen since being home, had to have help to get back up off of the floor. Cannot get in and out of bed alone. Could fall at any time. YET with all this - the person who is with him -- will be leaving him unattended at times... Periods of hours. He can get someone to come and help him if they are home -- they cannot lift him without help from others though.

In this situation, what is the right thing?

New at this. *Not related to person in need. Feel the need to help his main assisting person that he must have more assistance. I already told them that he must have someone there who can lift him.

did he leave rehab too soon?
does he need someone there who can lift him?
your thoughts:

Please advise.

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Im 49 years old, i had a mini stroke 10 years ago im doing fine except for my memory is terrible i live with my late husband John's (he died from strokes 3 years ago) eldest sister anyways she doesnt help me with my medication and i know i've overdosed on it cause i get extremely tired where i cannot stay awake. I dont like having a mini stroke cause it changed my way of life plus i want to live on my own but my family says no to me so i get depressed.
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asa
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I would have his doctor request an evaluation from a home health care provider. They will advise if physical therapy is needed and personal help in the home as well. They are also very good at talking to the "client" as to why these measures are necessary. Medicare takes care of all the charges.

Same for you sapawn...sometimes it is just necessary to be the adult and make decisions that ensure the safety and care our elders require.

Best wishes!
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My Grandmother had a stroke and no way she could be left alone and she kept having mini strokes and falls. I took care of her for several years before she had to go to the NH. My father who I tend to now can be left alone for short periods but not for a whole day or half a day. I would feel terrible if he would have a fall and he could not get up. Luckily the times he did fall my son was here to help him get up. It is dangerous for anyone living alone who has suffered a stroke in my humble opinion.
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What happens if an outsider comes in, sapawin? How does she try to keep them out?
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mom needs help won't let outsider in i have to work help!
has stage 2 demetia
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wow so many typos above..so sorry
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I wish I knew how old this person is. My husband suffered two major strokes before the age of 43. I can tell you this...the patient "usually' seems to feel that they can be left alone (maybe it's just a "man" thing). He wants his independance back and doesn't want to wait for it. It's a slippery slope when you don't want to "hover" over someone but you know they still need help. If this person, in any way, cannot get to a bathroom, or a phone or food and drink within seconds, then no, should not be alone. There's such a chance of recurrance and if not that, then of a fall. It's how you approach it with the patient that will make all the difference. The caregiver should not be leaving him alone in the state you describe even if that's what he wants. I would leave my husband at home when I knew my adult daughters would be there for a friend or...I would bring him with me. Hubby is completely independant now but it's been over 7 years. Still have a drop foot somewhat and can't use his right hand at all but..after about years he adjusted and learned how to do things "his way" again. He may no put his pants on like you or I, but he certainly can do it fine now. It's a learning process and it takes time. I would avoid anything that even remotely sounds to him like you are taking away his indepence. I just "happened" to go out when someone else was there. We didn't discuss this it's just what happened and he never complained about it. Good luck to you as a stroke is a difficult thing to deal with. Hugs
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It would be more affordable to hire companion care outside of an agency. The agencies cost an arm and a leg. If you can find someone you can trust and pay them 10-15$ and hour, that wouldn't use up the resources so quickly. I wish medicare/insurances had some sort of program like this that would be more economic and allow people to stay in their homes.
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I am a stroke victim and have fallen 15 times in 6 years.I keep four cordless phones on the floor so maybe I could get to one of them.I have been trained how to use my good arm on the sofa to get off the floor.Therapy is EVERY THING.My first 8 weeks I had six sessions per day.Then into nursing homes for 6 months with 3 therapies - 5 days a week.I had no insurance.Now I live alone.Each victim is different. The senior center can be a BIG help for him they will provide care and send him meals. Check it out.
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Very good advice above and I wish you well. If a person can be safe and get by at home that is usually the best (however $100000 a year of help is even worst than 45k for assisted living and 90k averages for a nursing home). In all cases falls will sometimes happen (and hopefully not result in an injury) but things can be done to reduce the likelihood of a fall. When people are in a situation like described they should have a professional do a home assessment and review necessary home mods to help. They should buy assistive equipment to allow them to help themselves and reduce injury potential. A medical alert should be an automatic for someone being left alone and there are "one time cost" ones available for about $300. Check out various products at AbleData. I advise people all the time of what is "out there" to help but can't ID myself. If you can find me I would be glad to help with greater details.
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Take it from someone who was dealing with a similar situation but is the daughter of the woman who a mild stroke. It was bad enough to screw with her short term memory and part of her long term. She is nearly 90, short by several months. I am an only child and only living relative in 1000 miles. The woman could not understand why I could not watch her 24/7. I have a home of my own and a husband that has medical issues. (He is a 15 year long Vet) along with having a part time job. After she had her stroke on Thanksgiving which she refuses to acknowledge that as a stroke or the one before over a year ago, she has been prone to falling. Not to mention not being able to turn on/off her security system. She has had the cops over there a few times due to that issue with her alarm. This last time, she was cooking on the stove and left it unattended only to nearly cause a fire. Thankfully the cop was able to get things taken care of before that happened. The question is are both of these people able to stay in their homes alone for any period of time? The answer is no. They get confused easily and easily distracted. Normal things they formerly did are now huge tasks for them. Even the simplest of things can be difficult for them. Mother talked with a social worker, nurse, etc and we were all saying she cannot live there alone. She got really upset! She fell again a few days ago. The nurse called an ambulance and took her to the hospital. Since Medicare will not pay for pay for an assisted living facility/nursing home unless the person is in the hospital for at least three days, we were sunk. Unless she paid privately. She refused to do that. Somehow she managed to get 24/7 care in her home via a team of people. They work in shifts. I believe she had to go through the network at the hospital to get this done. The problem? It is costing her over 2k a week! I am not sure how much Medicare is paying if any. Or how much her secondary insurance will cover if any. You can check with the nurse he has that comes in and checks on him. They usually have the names/numbers of people who can help. Keep in mind that she cannot directly discuss his case due to the HIPAA laws. So when asking, tell her/him you are concerned for his welfare and ask the person who to contact about 24/7 in home nursing. Also, talk with people at the rehab facility if you know which one he was in. Keep in mind due to the privacy laws, they cannot disclose any information about him. Do the same thing with them that you did with the nurse. Keep the questions general. They might know as well who to contact. You can also Google in-home care for that state/city and call a few companies that do that, perhaps they would have more information. I understand that it is their home and more likely than not the man has been there for a long time. Think of it as a loss to him that he cannot continue to live in his own home. He will be depressed and angry. He will come off being mean due to his confusion, frustration and anger. I know it is not easy to watch him being alone and fearing for his safety. You are a good person for being so concerned. The man should be grateful that he has you trying to look out for him. Best wishes in trying to find the answers to help both you and him.
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If he cannot get himself up to use walker, things he needs need to be placed within hands reach. Urinal too if he cannot get to bathroom. Sounds like he needs strength training. Look into home care therapists if it is too difficult to go out for therapy. Transfers getting up real important. If he breaks bones he can be set back and immobile. I think 2-3 hours should be ok for him to be left alone if he can reach/call someone if he needs help. His needs should be customized to his condition. He can get better if he "wants" to and if the right support is available to him. It is a step-by-step process. Conditions constantly change hopefully. Get them whatever advice and help --it is important. Bless you for being concerned.
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I have been taking care of my significant other for two and a half years. In no way should this person be left alone. What if there was a fire? Would he be able to get out of the house. The neurologist told me no longer than 1 hour at a time. What if there was a seizure? There could be a lot of damage if the squad was not called immediately. It sound like he could not even go to the bathroom alone. Being alone for long periods of time. Absolutely not.
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Did he leave rehab before they were ready to release him? In general I think it best to take full advantage of whatever insurance will pay for. But that decision is in the past.

Can he get to the bathroom by himself?

Did the stroke affect his cognitive abilities? Is he sharp in this thinking?

Does he have some kind of medical alert system, so he can press a button to get help if he falls? Is he capable of using a cell phone and would he have presence of mind to do so?

Does the doctor say that he should have 24/7 care? What is the prognosis? Is he expected to continue to recover, or is this likely to be his permanent status?

The "right thing" has to be highly customized for his particular situation. I don't think there are general guideline for "someone recovering from a stroke." You are a good friend to be concerned.
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