Can a person that has been declared incompetent ask the judge if she could live with her daughter? - AgingCare.com

Can a person that has been declared incompetent ask the judge if she could live with her daughter?

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Thanks for answering my questions. That guardian sounds as abusive as some people are with their Durable POA. I sure hope that you can find some resolution to this.
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My sister is not the guardian the guardian is not related. my sister is bipolar, narrisistic. She is always doing terrible things to everyone. My mother has dementia. The guardian just wants to show her authority by given me her restrictions and certain time to visit my mother it is a power thing with this woman because I asked about my mothers missing personal things, also her eyes, teeth etc. This goes on all over the usa, if you look up NAGSA ( national stop guardianship abuse) you will see horror stories of isolation, and liquidation . These abusive guardians need more accountability and less power.
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If you don't mind my being intrusive, but is it your mother or your sister who has the mental problems. If it is your sister, then just what kind of mental problems does your she have and are they serious enough for her to be considered unqualified to be your mother's guardian?
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I was going to go for guardianship my sister turned my mother against my brother and I a couple weeks before the hearing, my mother always enabled her because of her mental problem. My sister is the one that petitioned the court to declare my mother incompetent. My sister was jealous of me being DOPA and always helping my mother. I am trying to find an attorney that will take payments.
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So, this person has already been declared incompetent in court and someone has been given guardianship over her? Who was given guardianship? Why did the daughter not file for guardianship?

The guardian has no business isolating her and I believe you will need an atty to look into that.
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