Why is senior assistance asking me to care for my (hospitalized) elderly neighbors dogs?

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My recently hospitalized elderly neighbors have been abandoned by their children. I found a pet sitter to care for their two small and vicious , yappy dogs. The elderly husband is back from the hospital and refuses to pay the pet sitter. He has money. His hospitalized wife accused the pet sitter of taking advantage of them and the pet sitter began to cry. She wouldn't hurt a fly, she's honest and loving. The petsitter quit and social services called me and asked me to care for their dogs because I'm a dog owner and live right next door. I told her to get someone else and she said there isn't anyone else. She played on my guilt, saying " surely, you wouldn't let these little dogs suffer. They did nothing wrong" Well, I have the scars on my ankle from these little dogs from a previous visit. I might add that we live way out in the country, in a sparsely populated area. I'm the only neighbor around. For now, the dogs are being cared for. I feel guilty for not saying "yes" but I don't want to be accused of stealing down the road and having the elderly woman calling the police on me when she returns in two months from the hospital. Why is social services calling me about this? Do I have a moral obligation to care for my neighbors dogs? As long as my neighbors can rely on me, they won't hire anyone. I'm thinking my best option is to pack up the RV and leave town for a couple of weeks! I do believe in paying it forward, but enough is enough!

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You are not obliged to care for the dogs and you called only because you seemed the obvious, easy solution.
As a professional pet companion (30 years) the cost of dog care is (per day) in the clients home is on an average $30 dollars a day.That's far less kenneling or boarding them.
If the animal is aggressive or has medical issues it's more expensive.
By the way: I charge up front and cash before I even take the job.
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Softtouch, please practice over and over in front of the mirror, looking at yourself in the eyes, repeatedly saying, "Those little dogs are vicious. They bit me. And I have absolutely NO desire to deal with them at all." If you practice this repeatedly while looking at yourself in the eyes, then by the time you meet with the Senior assistance lady, you will do this with confidence. Not wishy washy - where she thinks she can do the guilt trip on you.

FYI, all those sports players got to be very good by practicing - both in their minds and on the court. The same applies with fire fighters - who practice scenarios of fires in their minds - so that when the real deal happens - they already know what to do - automatically. Looking into her eyes, you will show her that you mean business.
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There's no harm in their asking you. There's no harm in your saying "are you joking not in a million years" (or even just "no") either. But they shouldn't lean on you, and you shouldn't feel obliged to provide board and lodging for animals that you don't own and don't like.

Palmtrees I can't believe what I'm reading. They rang to ask you where their present was??? That is the rudest thing I have EVER heard. "Awfully grabby, darling" as mother would have put it. What were they thinking?
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Just tell the agency that the dogs have bitten you on past occasions, and since they don;t seem to like you, you could not possibly take care of them knowing you may have to come after the owners for future medical claims for dog bites. That ought to get you off the hook pretty fast!
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SoftTouch, you're wise not to accept a house key as well as any potential liability or accusations that might arise from this couple.

And I like your scorpion analogy! I've never heard that, but it's true for so many situations.
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Yes, no good deed goes unpunished. I have neighbors who I liked but knew they were, well "very important people" in their minds; liked them anyway. They took a long trip overseas and asked me if I would "mind" coming over and walking their dog several times a day and feeding her, etc. I did this and it was a long time to be tied down. But they were my neighbors. Recently their daughter got married and I sent a very expensive gift to her wedding shower. But little did it know I was expected to give a large check at the wedding as well. So I got a strange phone call asking where my "wedding" gift was. This was expected on top of the shower gift. I was stunned, then angry.

I probably saved these guys hundreds of dollars in dog boarding fees, several times. My point is when someone shows you who they are believe them the first time because they will eventually bite you in the butt.
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Yes, it sounds like you should stay far away from these people. I'd be wary of meeting with the senior assistance person if she's the same one who tried to guilt you into caring for the mean little dogs.

Being neighborly is a good thing, but only when your neighbors don't try to suck you into their drama.
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PS, the elderly husband is home right now and caring for the dogs. He has the early stages of dementia and will soon have his drivers license yanked by his doctors. He's had two minor strokes recently and a triple by-pass three years ago. He's been driving six hours round trip to visit his wife in the hospital about three time a week. Sometimes he stays overnight near the hospital where his wife is, but complains bitterly about the high cost of lodging in the city. He stays overnight about once a week, on the days when his wife is scheduled for more surgery. On those days, he needs a pet sitter. His wife's organs are failing (kidneys and pancreas) and she is on pain killers. When I spoke with her on the phone, she was like a spitting cobra! She's a very intelligent, manipulative, complaining woman in a lot of pain. No wonder her adult children are avoiding her! She is the scorpion who begged the turtle to give her a ride across the creek, promising not to injure the turtle, then stung the turtle when she reached the other side. When asked "why did you sting me?" by the turtle, she said, "because I'm a scorpion I can't help my nature".
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Thank you for your sound advice. I found out that the pet sitter gave my name to senior assistance as a possible dog sitting resource. Also, the pet sitter was a church member in my neighbors' church. My neighbor hired her, I just supplied him with her phone number. Hiring her was his idea, not mine. I am more involved then I'd like to be at this point and plan on meeting with the Senior assistance lady Monday to let her know I don't want to care for their dogs. Doing so would require a house key and I don't want access to their house for legal reasons. Pardon the pun, but having access to their home could literally "bite me in the fanny"! I'm not a licensed dog sitter, nor am I bonded or insured. I'm quite sure an attorney would tell me "no good deed goes unpunished."
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Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but if you hired the pet sitter, she could take you to small claims court to collect her fee if the dogs' owner refuses to pay. Your kind heart got you into this mess, and now it's best to stay out of it. Don't go into the neighbors' house; he seems like the type who would accuse you of stealing something.
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