Should I send my 90 yr old mother to the hospital so they can adjust meds? - AgingCare.com

Should I send my 90 yr old mother to the hospital so they can adjust meds?

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Mom has severe dementia and frets and crys for several hours a day. I'm working with a nurse prac who deals with geriatric psych and has been very helpful w/ medication but we are having troulble finding the right meds. She suggested placing her in a special hospital for 30 days to try to adjust or change the meds. Selfishly, this would give me a break but I'm concerned about the affect this would have on her. She does not know who I am or where she is so that is not the issue. My concern is that she has never been institutionalized and I do not want her to come out worse. I don't expect meds to perform a miracle but maybe make her life and mine a little more peaceful.

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I'd be careful July is when new residents start practicing in hospitals, I have read it's best not to go to the hospital in July since more mistakes are made by young inexperienced drs. And you might worry about infections, check first with the Joint Commission, you can look online, but look at various hospitals in your area and see how they rate on infection control, patient safety, elder care, patient satisfaction, etc etc.
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Typo she was on a gurney with NO food.
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I did and deeply regret it. They became excited with my mothers insurance, I wanted them to regulate her diabetes Meds. What I got were people telling me I,could not take care of her and I should admit her to their nursing home. it was nightmare getting her out and they laid a diabetic senior in a gurney for more than 12 hours with more food, hoping to crash her. Mother forgave me but I would NEVER repeat this mistake. PS I called 911 from the hospital and they nev came.
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I did it, and although it didn't take care of all her problems it helped a lot. If do it again, and I may have to. Everyday she would cry to die and no one would ever see this behavior but me. Luckily, she was having s bad day and I took her in to see c the doctor and c she melted down right in front of her. Next thing you know, she was in geriatric psych to get needs straightened out. She is much better and doesn't cry all the time.
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I'm assuming you could visit her while she's in the hospital, right? If that's the case, what do you have to lose? If she doesn't know you or where she is, then that shouldn't negatively affect her. I'd try to discuss the proposed treatment plan ahead of time so that you're comfortable with what they'll be doing for your mom and the professionals who will be treating her. Giving you a break is a side benefit, but dealing with a mom who is crying a couple of hours a day has got to be very hard on you. That would stress me out no end. So I would see it as a win-win situation for both of you. Even if your mom stays with you, the likelihood is that she'll be getting worse over time anyway, so anything you can do to delay that (while giving you a break) is a good thing.
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