I am now second guessing signing my mom up for hospice. Advice? - AgingCare.com

I am now second guessing signing my mom up for hospice. Advice?

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The services they offer are good except for the prevention or maintenance meds. Is it really to my advantage to keep mom under Hospice? They provide aides to assist with bathing,a nurse who come twice a week to check vitals,a chaplain who comes twice a month and a social worker to refer to. Also,a week of respite care.

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Holler, I've been through the hospice route with my dad. He was on no meds and was in excellent health before his brain cancer.

Everyone here has given excellent advice. Be frank with the nurses and open about what comfort care is available. It's a hard time for you, overwhelmingly so. I'm sure you are tired.

It's the hardest thing I ever had to go through in my life seeing my dad die. My heart goes out to you. It's rough stuff. Please let us know how you are doing. Always lots of kind hearts here on AC!
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Actually, I think the rule is that they will not PAY for drugs they deem inappropriate at this time. And that seems to be negotiable, once you see how your loved one does without them.

I was happy to be able to stop most drugs, since my husband had a difficult time getting them down. But we quickly added back in his dementia drugs, because it became obvious they were still working after nine years. Hospice is all about comfort care, and it is NOT comfortable to be agitated or to hallucinate.

The nurse or the social worker can sit down with you and explain why the decision was made about each drug. If you feel it is a mistake to remove one or more of them, explain why. For example, your mom seems to be on two antidepressants, one that is often used for sleep issues. If you find that her depression worsens or her sleep problems increase without these drugs, discuss that with the hospice nurse. Their goal is to keep patients comfortable. Sometimes drugs are no longer working and continuing to take them is no longer useful. But if it becomes clear that they are serving a useful comfort purpose that will make a difference.
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The advantage may not be apparent at first, but as the patient declines, you will get more help and you will need it. It's normal to wonder if you took the right step. You did.
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The maintenance drugs she is on are namenda,citalopram,furosemide,potassium,trazodone and potassium. Mom main diagnosis is dementia/alzheimers. My research revealed she could be with us 6 months or 6years the disease is not very predictable as far as life span. They are very quick to give pain pills and morephine for pain!
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some maintenance meds are curtailed with hospice because the jig is up. my mom ate 9 stool softeners a day. over 4 is not recommended but this is about comfort care, not longivity. maintenance meds may be discontinued because you patient has been deemed to have a 6 month lifespan. my mom was given haldol during her last 90 days on earth. haldol is not recommended for unstable angina patients but if moms heart is going to blow, let it blow with her emotional status under control..
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What medications are you making reference to? Are you seeing a difference since she's stopped them?
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