Anyone ever get scammed by a doctor?

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My Mom was sent to a specialist because it was suspected her UTI hadn't cleared up. The specialist prescribed an antibiotic which costs $100 a pill (x10 = $1000 to treat her UTI).

This is AFTER insurance paid half. These pills are $200 each. I was floored.

I only find this out because my sister tells me about it. I call Dad and ask why this particular prescription instead of something less expensive. He had no answers so I told him I'd look into it. Luckily, he hadn't picked up the prescription yet.

When I call the specialist, I am told they could not give me any information until Mom called them and gave them permission to share her case with me. I understand such things are private so Mom calls and gives permission.

I call back and the receptionist tells me she'll talk to the nurse for me. Two hours later, the nurse calls me to say Mom's test just got back and it was negative so she'll not need to take the expensive prescription.

I hang up relieved but wish I'd asked:
1. Why was she prescribed something so expensive?
2. Why was she prescribed anything before her test results?

Seriously, has anyone found their parents being taken advantage of? I fear this doctor was getting some kind of benefit for prescribing this particular antibiotic. I'm tempted to call back and see if I can get any answers. It sounds very fishy to me.

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and just what she's telling the doctor too!
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Someone really needs to be with mom to listen to whs t the doctor is telling her.
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Could mom have told the MD that she was having recurrent diarrhea as well as the UTI and perhaps went on & on about both? if so, I'd bet that she got one of the newer RX's for CDiff. They are beyond expensive:
Dificid runs about $ 3,500.00 for that prescription. yes 3 large! that would be $ 200 per pill. Another one - Vancocin runs about $ 500 - 800 for that RX.

If your folks aren't being seen by a gerontologist, really try to get them into a geriatric speciality practice.
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Get a copy of her medical record from that doctor. The patient is entitled to a copy of the record. They CAN charge for the copying. Or she can go there, ask to see the record and then you can photograph the pages yourself for free. Something is fishy there. Also, check out any future docs on health grades.com to see if there are negative reviews.
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UTI's can be chronic which means they may never "clear" up and are ever present though no symptoms are apparent. If the doctor is familiar with the patient he /she already recognizes the problem and prescibes a med before the tests are in.
If the UTI is recurrent or chronic a doc may put their patient on a daily low dose of antibiotic (expensive.
Doctors do not check the price of drugs.They prescribe what they feel will be most beneficial and appropriate for their patient.
The pharmacy will generally substitute a generic equivalent if available as it's a must under new insurance dictates unless the physician request specifies "no substitute".
Drugs are usually covered by your insurance.Places like walmart allow qualified individuals to obtain costly drugs for well under pharmaceutical recommendations of price though most will be generic.
Are doctors scammers? Some are and some are compensated for distributing certain brands.
However most physicians are no longer independant contractors but work the umbrella of large companies who dictate the time spent with a patient, the drugs their doctors should recommend etc. in return for malpractice coverage I suspect.
Large companies have calls farmed out to independant contractors.
Presciptions to one, appointments to another etc.They are not always in the same office, city or state.Often calls and call backs are automated, wait in a cue for an automated scripted response or "for the next operator" to return it.
They have little knowledge on their screen of the clients conditionmed history or diagnosis.
They read the script.
Talk with your druggist when in doubt over meds or cost. I find them to be more helpful and informative than the medical offices.
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The whole point was getting that rx filled and the money made from that sale. There was no risk for the doctor, as he could justify it because an earlier exam must have confirmed there was UTI. It's really easy in that circumstance to call the patient the next day or even days later to say, oops, our mistake, you didn't need that. But you (or your insurance) has already enriched the manufacturer and everyone riding it's coattails, by then. And that's the point of writing rx's for drugs that are THAT expensive. It's not always because you need them and every patient should question their prescribers about the need for each and every prescription, and make them really justify it. Many of those drugs do absolutely nothing and as we all see, a lot of the new ones do a lot of damage. It's not the good old days, when you could believe a drug does what it's supposed to do.
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If nothing else, it sounds like someone besides dad should be going to doctor's appointments with mom. Is it possible that the doctor said just that...don't fill this until we get the results, mom and dad didn't "hear" that? That certainly started to be the case with my mom a few years ago.
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FF, often for these new expensive drugs no generic is available.
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The most expensive meds I could find were Linezolid and Daptomycin, but neither one should be used without a positive culture showing MRSA or some other resistant bacteria. Shame on that MD, fire her and find another.
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Usually the *brand* named prescription can be quite expensive, but the pharmacy would fill the prescription with a generic which would be more affordable.
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