Can I say paperwork was signed before friend was diagnosed with Alzheimer's? - AgingCare.com

Can I say paperwork was signed before friend was diagnosed with Alzheimer's?

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I am being told that if the memory care facility he is in wants to give him antipsychotic drugs I can't stop them and say no. I don't think alternative measures have been exhausted. He's only been there a month and he is still adjusting. I have medical POA for friend who has no family. Now the memory care facility he is in says my POA does not give me the power to say no to putting him on heavy duty antipsychotic drugs. I understand their safety concerns for other residents but they are grossly exaggerating his behavior. He has only been there for 35 days. He's still adjusting. I don't believe other behavioral approaches or emotional support has been exhausted.

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Thanks again for replies! My attorney (and what I have found online) tell me that as his POA I DO have the ability to say No to a suggested treatment. He is not able to make any "informed consent" decisions due to advanced Alzheimer's. The POA gives me the right (and was my promise to him) to make "informed consent" decisions for him. Basically, they need to act as if I am the "patient". If they don't - and treat him against my wishes - it may be construed as "elder abuse" by some courts. It's the constant battle that is wearing me down - on top of the concern for him, and my personal struggle with watching him fade. Anyone caring for someone slowly making their transition from this reality knows what I'm trying to say and how I'm feeling and I appreciate the support here!

I know I face the possibility of the facility deciding he is not a "good fit" and would then have to move him to another facility, but I don't believe it will be different anywhere else.
I'm a reasonable person and not hard to work with. I know there is a time and place where drugs are useful and necessary, I just want to do what's best for him, not what's most convenient for the facility. They need to try and work with him more than they have and having a large portion of their care workers brand new staff, young, and inexperienced makes it more challenging for all. Drugging the residents to make their job easier is not the answer! Thanks for caring and good wishes for your joy in all you do!
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You might have legal ability to stop the anti-psychotics. However, if you are able to do this and the facility believes that other patients or staff are in danger from him, it is very possible that they will require that he be removed from the facility.
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The medical POA only gives you the right to carry out your friends wishes. The home is required to keep you up to date with his care. You should have regular care meetings. You can tell them his likes and dislikes and your concerns. But they r now responsible for his care. Just make sure you are there regularly. Keep eyes and ears open. You also have the right to move him if u feel he isn't getting good care.
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I would ask to talk to the doctor who wrote the order. He may just be going by what the staff tells him. Express ur concerns to him. The doctor may put him on a low dose or another drug. Your friend may need an axiety drug to help him get used to things. Staff cannot administer meds without a doctors order. Why was he hungry? In Moms facility they get breakfast at 8am, lunch 12pm, and dinner at 5pm all with large portions. Snacks are given in between.
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Thanks for replies! POA WAS signed before he was diagnosed. Unfortunately, the social worker is part of the care "team" and they are all on same page as the facility as far as drugs being the first line of attack for any type of disruptive behavior. The other night when I was there immediately after he got upset, I found out he was hungry! That was the reason for his agitation. So now they know that he will NOT ask for food and his agitation may just be simply that he is hungry! What bothers me is they don't want to spend time looking at the events/situation leading up to his agitation, they just document the incident and use it as the reason for drugs! I'm beginning to believe this is in fact the norm at most memory care facilities. The system is broken if you ask me.
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It sounds like you are being a good advocate for your friend. He's lucky to have you watching out for him.

Speak with the social worker at the facility. Social workers are an incredible source of untapped resources. The social worker has nothing to do with what kind of meds your friend does or doesn't take but he/she can be an impartial liaison between you and the facility.
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I would find a doctor that handles this medical "psychotic" condition and take to. Living in a facility does not mean the resident has to be treated by their doctors. When my mother was in a nursing home for after surgery rehab (yeah right), I maintained her doctors and took her to visits. All the facility did was administer the meds the doctors I approved prescribed.
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