Safety with clients who have dementia when to use the controlling approach?

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I'm with JJGood, a controlling approach is usually a LAST resort.

Distraction (it doesn't have to be related to what you're trying to accomplish) usually is the best bet. (I'd like to show you the beautiful flowers outside. We can walk this way to see them."

The promise of a treat at the end of the task might help. "When we get back we can have a chocolate cookie."

If the patient refuses to cooperate, stop your attempt, leave and come back 10 min. later. (Don't mention that you were there a few minutes ago or you are trying it again.)

Make it seem like it's their idea to do the task. "You wanted to go for a walk, we can do that now."

Sometimes just starting the chore and involving them in it will work. "I know you don't want a bath right now so we won't but could you hold the towel for me, while I just wash your face?" Giving them something to do while you accomplish your task, makes them focus on what they're doing, not what you're doing.

Giving them advance notice helps, along with choices. "Would you like me to come back at 10 am or 11am to help you do your exercises."

Challenging them sometimes works. "That is a long hallway, I'm not sure you could make it." Being proud, they usually will attempt to show you that you're wrong.

Ask "seasoned" caregivers what works for them. The c/g's that have worked with the demented for a long time have a lot of tricks up their sleeves to get the patient's cooperation.

I've tried some of these with my patient and they work.
Try not to seem anxious and don't raise your voice.
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Treats work well too ;-)
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Treats work well too ;-)
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I don't know what the controlling approach is, but my Mom, who has dementia, does not respond well to anyone trying to control her. She does much better when people aren't telling her what to do. Suggestions, redirection, making her laugh first, all these things seem to make her more cooperative, for the most part.

Hope someone has some good info for you.
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Lucinda1, I am moving your post back toward the front page. Hopefully someone will be able to answer your question.
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