Safety of 24-hour in-home care? - AgingCare.com

Safety of 24-hour in-home care?

Follow
Share

My siblings and I are considering 24-hour in-home care for our parents, however, none of us will be living with them. Is it safe to have 24-hour caregivers (2 or 3 shifts) without another family member there to watch over them? Or is it safer for them to be in a nursing home? They are mostly bed-ridden and need help getting into their wheelchairs for a few hours a day. They are also in the early stages of dementia -- but only people who know them would recognize it. They have done better in healing from their health challenges while being at home and with each other, than when they were separated and in different rooms in the nursing rehab center.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
26

Answers

Show:
1 2 3
Louwms, yes we are similar! My husband, too, is reclusive, and I'm outgoing. I did a lot of traveling before his last decline and I'm hoping to again. He has gotten used to the caregiver and I've been experimenting recently with having her do overnights so hoping to ease back into traveling! One thing I have found is that consistency is so important. I'm hoping caregiver and I will become interchangeable soon! It took me a year to find someone I could really trust but once I did, it has been so freeing. I think I've said before, I have cameras so I can keep an eye on things. I sleep in the same room with him and lock the bedroom door so he can't wander at night. And, his anti anxiety meds, along with melatonin, help him sleep through the night. Like everyone else here, we just keep truckin one day at a time.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Jazzy2 I'm similar, 70 with 82 spouse, dementia (Parkinson's probably) We are trying home helpers and will try day stays nearby. We do plan to use one week respite stays occasionally for my sake. He's reclusive, I'm outgoing. Tough making these changes!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Nursing home over in home care with an agency. Not even close.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

jeannegibbs

to finish what I wanted to say, the one facility my mom was at, medications was separate (and expensive)

Commenting on your post about having people around to look out for residents, this same facility, a man died, because he could not breathe. There was an STNA on duty but he did not know what to do. He tried to track down the nurse on duty, but it took a while. It was so bad, that he even asked men who were at the facility to do a survey, if they could help. End result, nurse came, thought the man cou ld breathe better, no improvement, paramedics called tried to revive the man, took him to the hospital, he died.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

jeannegibbs

Just curious. Wher
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Thank you all for your answers. You have all been very helpful. I feel so blessed to have a community, like this, which I can turn to for help. God bless you all!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I also have a camera focused on the room where I keep valuables. Caregivers have been told not to go in there. If anyone ever does, the system will alert me and I can call and ask if I can help. I've never had problems with agency but private care is a different story.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I have cameras in my home to monitor my husbands care when I'm not at home. I also have assistance from hospice in addition to the daily caregiver.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

There are benefits to having someone come in 24/7 to care for your parents.
There are also benefits to placing them in a facility, assisted living or if they need medical care a "nursing home"
If you go the route of having someone care for them at home I suggest that you get an agency.
The people are bonded and there is the assurance that if someone is ill they can call for a replacement. And if there are problems you can always ask the agency to send someone else.
The benefit also of in home care is that they are comfortable.
The benefit of a facility is that there is someone 24/7 and a full staff.

You might also want to contact Hospice to determine if they are both Hospice qualified. This will also get you a nurse into the house once a week as well as a CNA for both at least 2 maybe 3 times a week and you will also have supplies provided as well as any equipment that is needed to help.

If you decide to have someone come into the house get a safe to place valuables in or better yet remove them from the house.
And now would be a good time to disperse the items that are in the house that will go to you or the siblings. This may upset them but just tell them that you are taking them for safekeeping. Sell what is not needed.
When and if they have to be moved to a facility for more care it will be easier to sell the house.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

What do your parents say? I am a 72 year old taking care of my 80 year old husband with advanced Parkinsons and dementia. My preference when the time comes is to go to AL. I've always been very social and like all the activities. My husband, on the other hand, is an introvert We have friends who still visit him. I've tried taking him to day care but he hates it. He asked me to promise to let him die at home like his father before him and grandfather before him. I have an assistant 6 hours a day who is a lifesaver. She is from an agency. I've had bad experiences with outside help. I just think it's such an individual matter. There are pluses and minuses to both. Go with what makes them happiest. And, for sure, do not split them up. They have each other. That's more important than anything, even health and safety.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

1 2 3
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions