Is there a safe way to lift an elder who's fallen (but not been injured)?

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Mom fell today in the bathroom and couldn't get up. I spent 10 or 15 minutes trying to get her up myself (my husband was out), and finally just used brute strength to do it. I'm now feeling it in my back (which was already bad) and my neck (ditto) and will probably go into a flare (fibromyalgia). Didn't have a choice on this, though, as I coudn't leave her lying on the bathroom floor. Any tips or tricks?

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I am hearing more and more good things about the Camel/Elk inflatable cushions from my customers. I don't handle them but they may be the answer in many cases- "pick my brain" if I can help you.
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I find myself in the same situation with my father. He falls, I get him off the floor. But, now I have hurt my back and shoulder from picking him up. From now on we have decided to push the Lifeline button and let the Ambulance come and pick him up. It is safer for him and me to do it that way.
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NO gait belts! When RK fell on the stairs, he landed face down at the bottom. I told him not to move for 5 minutes, to give him time to be totally aware of what hurts and what extremeties can move. After 5 minutes, he rolled over on his back. Another 5 minutes and he could sit up. NEVER rush to pick them up.
Elders have fragile spines. If they have a slight fracture and you pick them up with a gait belt, you may SEVER the SPINAL CORD.
If they cannot roll over or sit up on their own, you call 911. Be safe.
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A bathroom robe belt doesn't have the strength of a gait belt and may break- causing more risk of injury. A regular belt is too narrow and may cause internal injuries to the person. Therapists suggest using the gait belt for guiding- not lifting- for the same reason- however many people use them. The wide cushioned belts I mentioned above would be a better choice if lifting is commonplace. If I can offer any other suggestions to help people please let me know.
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Next time call paramedics to do it -- honestly, even if hubby is home. They're experts, can evaluate her condition, and easily get her up without that brute strength you mention that can easily break bones in the elderly. Plus!! Mom will thoroughly enjoy being pampered by handsome young men in uniform!
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I don't own a gait belt yet, but I was told by one of my aunt's PT's that you could also use the belt off a bathrobe in a pinch. He showed me the gait belt at the hospital. Could you use a regular belt?
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I'll look into the Camel chair - sounds interesting. Thank you!
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My expertise is in bed mobility problems but one of my customers just purchased one of the Camel inflatable chairs from the distributor in Michigan. She reported that it does exactly what it was supposed to do- lifts her husband off the floor. The Camel hasn't been mentioned yet in this discussion so I wanted to let new people know it exists. Also- the gait belt is a great helper for guiding people in walking but the medical experts don't recommend it for lifting people. The narrow width could hurt the person- however there are better, wider, cushioned versions (with handles to grab) that would be much better (Posey is the "big name" in gait belts but there are others too). If additional info is needed please let me know.
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I saw the gait belt, and think it could be useful. I'll be picking one up. Thanks.
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the first 3 significant falls my dad had happened within several days. my dad was 6'2" and a big guy altho he had been losing weight. due to oxygen depletion, dad was confused and could not get him self to a position where Mom and I could help him to stand up. I like Jeannette's suggestion. there is also something called a "gait belt" which is used in rehab facilities. an absolute godsend and only costs $6 or $8 at a medical supply store. Not sure if it can be used for getting someone up off the floor. good luck!
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