Is it safe to transport a lot of oxygen long distance? Is it legal?

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How is a patient generally transported when moving? She is a lung transplant patient who's lungs are failing miserably now and the transplant facility that gave her her first transplant 4 years ago has denied her another transplant. She is very sick right now and in the hospital just getting over the flu. We are moving to be closer with family and we have been told to choose a transplant facility to use for her inpatient care. Being that she has been denied at this facility, wouldn't insurance cover her transport to another facility where she may have a chance? I don't feel comfortable transporting her as a "hospice" patient on so much oxygen. She is on 8L at rest. I don't feel comfortable with her even being discharged from the hospital in light of the fact that at this other facility, she would still be considered a potential candidate for transplant and not a hospice patient.

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Just offering an option. Air Ambulance companies transport patients with high flow oxygen requirements up to 15 liters per minute as so some long distance ground transport companies like MED Coach. Both are expensive but some help file insurance like Angel MED Flight and other ground companies help with financing like MED Transport Center.
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No insurance will not transport. If she was denied at this facility, she will be denied at others. Your insurance may not cover a second transplant. You cannot get anywhere near an airplane with O2 tanks.
You are having a hard time accepting her discharge as a Hospice patient, so I suggest you get some counseling. It's not easy, I know.
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What do the hospital discharge planners tell you? Is she currently on hospice? Why is the second transplant being denied?
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