I've run out of responses to Mom's delusions! Any ideas?

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She can't be distracted with activities or humoring - everything is too complex! Mom has moderate dementia - vascular plus Alzheimer's. Always a complex and intelligent woman, and still is - but when she's in "mid-delusion", they're so complex that it's practically impossible to respond. She thinks we're living elsewhere, that people have stolen all her artwork, that I move all of our belongings from place to place, and so on and so forth. She also involves stories from TV into these. Everything is a conspiracy. Any recommendations for more complex delusions and how to diffuse them? One mixed blessing is that her stroke has left her unable to walk,, so she can't take off. Getting harder every day!!

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It is a tough to handle the complicated delusions. My mother held onto one for a couple of years that the people that worked on the foundation of the house left the house on stilts. This made cracks in the floor and air was blowing through. She put down blankets and towels to cover the cracks, creating a terrible trip hazard. Other family members and I assured her that the house was fine and the floors were fine, but she would return to the delusional thoughts. This went on for about 2 years and slowly faded. In this case I couldn't agree with her, since it would mean expensive and unnecessary work be done on the house. I could only assure her each time that the house was fine.

The only recommendation I have is think of what will reassure your mother and do the same each time she repeats a delusion. Sometimes a little humor helps. For example, my mother thought a tree is my neighbor's yard was making her sick, so she was going to cut it down. I told her it wasn't the tree, it was the mailbox, so she should cut down the mailbox. She would think on it for a minute, then realize I was kidding. That ended the conversation about the tree until the next time.

I should mention that, even though the bad delusions have passed now, my mother still has a blanket over the rug in her bedroom. Don't ask me why. I pick it up. She puts it back. I finally realized that it was a trip hazard that was going to be there, no matter what I did. I gave up fighting that battle.
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Remeron is what has worked for my mom, started in addition to the zoooft and very low dose of klonopin. Looking back, when the geripsych at her nh started her on remeron, most of the "omg, what if..." stuff stopped. She's not "drugged" by any stretch, walks, talks, interacts. Just the awful dread and panic is no longer there. She has a nice quality of life,
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As in, you're engrossed in a book and she's nattering on and you say "hmmmmm?" as a non-response. I guess my point is that you can't stay sane and respond to this stuff all the time.
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Momsroomate: How does the response "hmmmmm?" work with your mom?
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Thanks all - I. do make sure to try not to argue, but get caught off-guard so many times! The "you're safe" response has worked, but not always, and less so these days. Saw neurologist about 2 months ago with these issues, but we all came away agreeing that things were not yet bad enough to start trying new meds. Really hesitant to go through trials so many of you go through to find the right one. She's already on so many other prophylactic meds for stroke/hbp and anti-depressant. Will ask doc about Zoloft an klonopin. thanks again.
I moved in to take care of Mom 5 years ago, in her home. Get respite care in once per week for a day out, and sometimes the odd evening too.
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My mom had delusions after her stroke when she was in rehab last year. People wanted money, there were dead bodies, she had to find and manage her own meds. Psych docs tried several meds. Zoloft eventually kicked in, and low doses of klonopin help. Reassurance...mom, you're safe here, we won't let anything bad happen to you" worked some of the time. Thankfully, it was a phase that is over now. Sometimes you just have to get through to the other side.
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Just agree with her and ask if she has recommendations on how to address the issue.

Logical reasoning is impossible during these episodes, and disagreeing or arguing with her could only increase her agitation.
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How exhausting for you.
This is definitely something to take to the doctor for help.
Does she live with you, or is she in a residential facility?
Do you have a way to get respite frequently?
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Well, there are meds that might help, but they can have mixed results and side effects. And, does she remember the "plot" from day to day? I suppose you could play along more, like you are fleeing together from the thieves who want to steal even more stuff and slowly trying to piece together clues about them. Her intelligent mind is trying desperately to make sense and find an explanation for what is happening to her, and the result is richly detailed confabulation...of course the real thief in the case is her dementia but that's hardly the conclusion she'd want to draw if she could help it.
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