Should she risk surgery or let the eye go blind? - AgingCare.com

Should she risk surgery or let the eye go blind?

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She is 87 has a detached retina. She will need general anesthesia for the surgery. We are worried about the anesthesia causing dementia or other cognitive problems. What is the risk? She has a sound mind and lives alone and cares for herself at present. The question is, "Does she risk this for the sight in this eye?" HELP!

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Someone should stay with this woman 24/7 if she goes ahead with the surgery.
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I don't think that anesthesia and surgery actually cause Alzheimer's or cause dementia. but whatever her decision, it is up to her. I think it is better if you let her decide. She can also ask the help of a professional regarding that matter
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My dad was 90 and had a few eye surgeries for glaucoma as well as for a stone in his bile duct. Mentally my dad is super sharp but I too was very concerned about the anesthesia. However after speaking to both anesthesiologists (obviously separate surgeries) they assured me he would be fine and they have seen even older patients do well so we proceeded and he's a sharp as he's always been. Speak to your mom's dr for the reassurance and proceed. Best to you,
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Go ahead with the surgery because she is of sound mind.
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I am so sorry for you and your mother !!
Unfortunately my mother had the same problem and yes we went ahead with the surgery! The first surgery she had didn't work so the dr did a second one ! It worked but she is totally blind in that eye now ! She has the right eye, it's hard for her to see write etc !! She has dementia Alzheimer's and Louie Bodies!! She thinks the eye will get better!! I won't lie to her tho !
This disease called Macular Digeneration is hereditary and we found out my aunt has it too !!
Good luck to you !!!
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She is of sound mind. Does dementia run in her family? Does she know anyone who actually developed dementia after surgery? Are you constantly stressing the dementia possibility to her? It's her decision. Frankly if it was me, I would have the surgery. I'd rather lose my hearing or my mobility than my eyesight.
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As one who had a detached retina about 9 years ago (at age 55), I had several surgeries that restored a portion of the vision that was eventually lost. A couple of the surgeries required general anesthesia. Whether or not laser surgery would be a choice depends on several factors, as each case of retinal detachment is different. I became blind in my dominant eye, and it took some time to get used to it, but essentially nothing in my lifestyle has been changed. However, it might be different for an elderly person having dementia. Patients having surgery for retinal detachment may have results ranging from total blindness in the eye to excellent vision. By the way, the treatment for a detached retina typically results in a cataract fairly soon afterwards, so this should be taken into account if the patient hasn't already had a cataract or had surgery for it.
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My mother is legally blind and she would do anything to have her sight back she is 88 and living in her own home. She also has Parkinsons, dementia, and the hardest thing for her is not being able to see and she gets very depressed about it. so if this surgery is not life threatening I would do it.
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I would definitely stay with her post surgery. Eye surgery is different from other surgeries in that, simply, they're your eyes, your vision, and your window to the world.

I think anyone would be a bit edgy, especially an older person.
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Nobody stayed with my mom when she was recovering but I was there every day to bring her food and help her with stuff she needed. I don't remember how many times a day I stopped in but she did stay alone overnight after I made up her bed with pillows to keep her in the right position overnight. I don't remember helping her shower, either. I don't know how she worked that out.

Jacqmoo - I think you should talk to your mother's doctor about her aftercare requirements. Your mother would probably need a little extra support in any event because general anesthesia knocks many people for a loop for at least a day or so.
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