What rights does a caregiver have?

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The POA is a family member and is not doing what is best for the elder in the caregiver's home.

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I don't know what state you live in but here the POA is like an insurance policy, the elder gives the rights to the caregiver to oversee their affairs, but only if they become incapacitated and unable to make a decision, or care for themselves. It is more like a having someone watch over their shoulders and make sure they are able to take care of their business. My daughter has a POA for me, but I still run my own affairs. Only if my wife or I become unable to care for ourselves would she intervene.
In my wife's case her father recently passed away, her mother has dementia and is unable to handle her affairs. My wife pays her bills, looks after her assets and makes the decision for her, but her sister and she have an agreement and consult on every issue. Something rare in many families. Believe me, a POA is a royal pain, not only does my wife have to do all the paperwork for her parents, she has to handle our household budget and work.
POA are designed to make it easy for the caregiver to make a decision in case that person become incapacitated. A POA does not give the POA the right to intervene on one's part unless a person is unable to.
What is important is that you choose the right person to handle your affairs, unfortunately, families seem to get greedy.
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HappyGal, It doesn't work to say Drugs bad, vitamins good. As you may know, the FDA doesn't regulate supplements, so you can't be sure they are as labeled, or if they are contaminated. Here in Mass., a grandmother died of vitamin D poisoning due to an error at the dairy.

Ferris means that the more vitamins you take, the more vitamins you pee out of your body every day. Your urine is expensive because it contains a high percentage of the expensive vitamin pills you take. Right, Ferris?
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POA doesn't have near the writes a guardian does, if you're seeking for specific rights, go for guardianship if necessary. Guardianship will only be granted if the person is proven incompetent
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OK. Was the urine something like Premarin? Very expensive horse urine? Mom got suckered into taking that. It's really her high potency Cranberry supplement plus a great probiotic that helped her with the UTI situation.

There are a LOT of reasons not to trust the FDA, but unfortunately that's all we have I think. Well I guess there are countless things one can take for a fast demise! Or perhaps, vitamins and food, NOT to take! ha. Lots of ways to think about it.
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The "vitamins" I wrote about were foreign herbal supplements which are not approved by our FDA. The husband basically wanted her dead, as she was worth a lot of money. Basically, vitamins are worthless and expensive urine (and that is the most recent research). The only one I take is a prescription Vitamin D and biotin - because it really does help my fingernails...
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What kinds of "vitamins"? People usually die from drugs, not vitamins, although one should learn which supplements, food, and vitamins don't mix well with drugs. It's the drugs that interfere with the body, not the vitamins. I guess you were quoting "vitamins" because who-knows-what it was?
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If you are hired by an agency, tell your supervisor your concerns. Then when confronted, the person with the POA, can fire you and replace you with someone who will not interfere. I had a similar situation where the husband was giving his wife (an Emmy-winning t.v. producer) pills from foreign countries so I took the list of 60 "vitamins" to a pharmacist who stated if one were to consume all of these every day, they would die. I told my agency, they consulted the sister and father who were judges, but the husband had a right to do what he saw fit. She died after I was replaced. (No, I did not give her those "vitamins", I flushed them).
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Do not agree to become the caregiver if another family member is the POA. The non-caregiver rarely understands how much work it is to be the caregiver. Ideally a non-family member, trusted professional should have the job or the caregiver should be the POA.
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You have the right to challenge the POA in court. You have the right to demand a written contract with share-of-cost for the room and board. You have the right to submit receipts (keep a copy) for reimbursement on money you spend on your parent. You have a right to privacy in your own home.
You do not have the right to see your parent's finances. POA's are supposed to keep that confidential. Does that help?
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Can you give us some ideas of what the Power of Attorney is not doing?
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