How can I revoke my Mom's medical POA? - AgingCare.com

How can I revoke my Mom's medical POA?

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My mom appointed her roomate in Texas, I live in Missouri. Her roommate put her in a hospice facility in TX. I want to bring her home to MO and take care of her in my home. hospice will come in and help. i work from home taking care of people part time with disabilities. i have a nice home , a room for mom, and my sister and daughter are ready to help. the lady that has medical poa of mom, owns the house and rents mom a bedroom .. i dont know how long my mom has ,so i need to get it fixed this week and get her home

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Let it be She has bonded to this woman and trusts her enough to give her POA. Moving her home with you will not fix anything, and the disruption will hurt your mother. She has a home right where she is, and the care is already arranged. You have a full time job, you cannot just drop that cold, how on earth will you make ends meet? Your heart is jumping but your common sense is yelling too and you need to listen to it.
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so is she still actually in the house where she's been renting a room or is she now in an actual hospice facility? so is it considered somewhat long-term or is she considered short-term? as I understand it where I am, the actual hospice facility here is just for short-term
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Perhaps your mother made the decisions she made because you were caring for someone else and she might have felt caring for two elderly women would be too much?

I'm wondering as well how it happened that your mother ended up just renting a room when you have a house in which you care for others. It seems to me that your mother would have been a higher priority than strangers, even if you were paid for caring for them.

As others wrote, it's only your mother who can change someone designated to act under a DPOA. You actually have no rights under it if you're not so named.

I have the sense that there's more going on to the reason why your mother is renting a room in another state but now you want to bring her back. Those reasons likely need to be addressed before it would be prudent and/or safe for your mother to return, especially if she needs hospice care. Moving her in her condition might cause undue anxiety and/or trauma.

Perhaps you could just rent a room in the home in which your mother is living and stay with her until the end; it might be a lot easier on her.
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do you know why she made her POA in the first place?
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Is your mother coherent? What does she want?

Have you spoken to the main hospice nurse?
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Topanga, has hospice given any idea of how much longer your mother has? If she is hardy enough, you may be able to move her. Would her healthcare POA agree to the move. You can't revoke a POA yourself, as GSA wrote. The current POA can resign, however, if she chooses. It would probably be easier just to discuss the move with her and make sure she agrees with it.
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how did she wind up just renting a room from somebody?
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You cannot revoke her power of attorney. You can pursue legal guardianship but if your mother is on hospice moving her is not the kindest, and you may not have time. Have you tried talking to the person who does have POA? Would they consider your wishes?
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