My father-in-law did reverse mortgage on his house with an Alzheimer's diagnosis. Can this be undone?

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We live in Maryland. My father in law did a reverse mortgage on his house while he was diagnose with dementia and Alzheimer. Can this be undone? Anyone know a good lawyer that can help?

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I am reading through this. Both sides. Scam or helpful? Well, my dad was a victim of elder fraud. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 3 years before the RM. his daughter had him sign a POA and she is a mortgage officer/underwriter/processor since 1985. She took all the money and he financially suffered greatly until his death last month. She was arrested and admitted to taking 100% of the funds but with a 3 year statute of limitation on felonies in Missouri she is scott free. The bank, PA, attorney general, no one will touch this case. I have proved without a shadow of doubt along with a signed affidavit from his physician he was mentally incompetent. Did he pass the test that I hear so many of you speak of. Yes he did. And what a ridiculous test given by an individual with zero medical knowledge with only 10 questions where you can miss 4 of them. One question should be, do you have any medical disabilities as to which an elder could not receive this loan and there should be medical proof they are of sound mind and body to proceed with loan. The test was taken over the phone so there is no assuredy he was the one answering. Did he sign? Of course he did. He did whatever you said to do, he had Alzheimer's and he tried to act like he understood what was going on. It went as far as his physician calling senior abuse hotline on my sister for a state investigation where they had the POA removed. If there is an actual POA and the borrower is deemed mentally incompetent then a physicians letter must be presented to the bank. But the bank is big and powerful and the test taker does what ever to get this loan. There are not enough governing laws for this type of loan to protect our parents. I believe RM is the biggest mistake ever. Period. Can I provide for my dad, did I want to save his house, this is not about children's gains unless you are the one stealing from the RM.
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What is so terrible about a reverse mortgage? In some cases, It can be a wonderful way for the elderly - without much income - to take advantage of the equity in their home. Unless he/she spends it all in an outrageous lifestyle change, it should be a boon to the elderly to have significant funds at their disposal, and unless all spent, there should be enough funds left to re-buy the bank's stake it in.
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My Mom diagnosed with dementia in 2014 and a Public Guardianship was appointed. Two years later, they applied for a reverse mortgage. The loan was approved in February, 2016 and in April she was put in a skilled home nursing facility. I believe it was done intentionally. Now they are petitioning to sell the house and are under valuing the property by 125,000. What can I do?
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There are pro and con regarding reverse mortgage. Fonzie and Robert Wagner makes it sound so good, and in part it is, but right now my boss is dealing with the end result of a reverse mortgage.

My boss's wife past away last week and since she was loan holder on the reverse mortgage and not her husband, even though he inherited the home he now has 30 days to decide what to do according to how this reverse mortgage was written... he has to either pay back the *mortgage* or sell the house within 6 months or the house will go into foreclosure.

My boss is heartsick over his wife's passing, and now he feels he will be out on the street within months. Same would have happened if the house was Will to the grown children, they would either have to pay back the mortgage or sell the house. The home will sell quickly so he is frantically looking for a new place to live.
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If the elder was on Medicaid, then the Medicaid Estate Recovery Program (MERP) will place a claim or a lien on any assets in the estate. All states are required to do a MERP Notice of Intent to all who get Medicaid who are over 55 and die. How MERP runs is dependent on what your states' laws are for probate, death, estates. But whatever the state, the MERP lien or claim will have to be released before clean title can be issued on the property.

It would be interesting to know how the competing claims or liens of MERP & the RM company deal with this type of situation. Anyone dealt with this?
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I neglected to mention. Am the sole beneficiary of my grandmother's estate and the new executor (original deceased). The mortgage company has refused to speak to me regarding this loan. I've submitted my Letters of Testamentary and even supplied a short certificate. I feel, this is all one big SCAM!
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@Lmariewellert: Only signature on the loan application is my grandmother's. There is a section on the application for POA to sign but, she was smart enough not to sign it. My grandmother was never deemed incompetent, but was in the late stages of dementia and having behavioral disturbance issues. This is all documented in her medical records. I know for certain my aunt never used the money for my grandmothers care. Medicaid paid for her stay in hospice (she was only there 8 days). And life insurance paid for the funeral. No money was ever put into the home for upkeep of the property. She withdrew ALL the money for personal gain. I obtained copies of the 2 withdrawals she made from the bank
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@qwashington: If your aunt had POA over your grandmother, then most likely she sign on behalf of your grandmother during the transaction. Please know that the POA has a lot to do in order for the loan to be approved, including the counseling, doctors letters etc. If your grandma was deemed incompetent and your grandma signed the documents after diagnosis, then this is illegal. Did you aunt use the money for your grandmothers care? can you prove that your aunt took the money for her own personal? if this is the case, I would contact a elder law attorney! For some reason, your grandma trusted her daughter by giving her POA. I hope this helps.
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RMs, at their best are intended to provide funds to the elderly toward end of life. They certainly are not intended to save an inheritance. What may be good for dad, may not be good for the kids. That is not necessarily a bad thing.
So, my question to you, before you proceed to look to undo anything, is why did dad do this? If he wanted / needed the funds to facilitate or better enjoy his life, it is a reasonable way to leverage HIS asset. What is his alternative for additional income he may want or need? Can you provide him income, if he saves the home for your inheritance? Can you buy the home at market value?
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If children believe their parent has beginning Alzheimer's Disease, is incompetent, and, more importantly, is even SOMEWHAT likely to exercise his/her powers to transact business, they would be wise to obtain guardianship through the courts.

Guardianship? Mortgage not valid. No guardianship? VERY difficult to prove that three years ago someone was incompetent. In fact? I'd say impossible.
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