I don't understand how the results of a neuropsychological exam can be used?

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My SO has agreed to have one, at his son's behest. His son has persuaded his 86 year old father to have a neuropsychological evaluation for which the son made the arrangements. His father does not see it as anything but a loving gesture and a way to help him with writing his memoir. You should know that my SO's sons dispise me. The one who requested the exam always thinks of himself first. As his aunt says, Kirk is only in it for himself. It is clear that my SO has some memory loss (he is 86 years old). About a year ago, my SO made an agreement with this son that if he did not make progress on his goals that his son could aggressively seek a more supportive environment for his father. Given the degree to which this son dislikes me because he sees his inheritance at stake, I feel this is the first step towards removing me from his father's life. I am frightened because I don't know how the results of an exam like this can be used. Can it be used to seek a tempory guardianship? What process would be used to force a father to move out of the home he owns? Can the son use the results of this exam to gain control of his father's assets? Should I be worried? Should I hire an attorney? I really don't know what to do. Thank you for listening.

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Getting legal counsel at this point may seem like overkill, but if you think SO's son is angling to become his guardian then you will sleep better if you understand the whole guardianship process and what his and your rights and abilities are to contest his pursuit of that.
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Ah.

Um. You own a dementia care business and you're asking us about the possible implications of a neuropsych exam?

Does the son have POA?
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I live with my SO full time. There is less than $200K at stake. I provide a substantial amount of household support, managing household repairs, doing laundry, cooking and financial advice. BTW, I own a dementia care business, so this strikes close to home.
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How is your sense of humour bearing up in this situation?

The reason that I ask is, I need to ask an even cheekier question. Which is: is the son's inheritance at stake?

Let's say no, it isn't. (Not to be judgmental or anything, but you really, really don't sound like much of a gold-digger). Then that gets the money out of the way, and instead you can concentrate on managing SO's sons' sucky attitude without its bothering you, and co-operate with the aim of securing SO's best interests - even if you only do that at arm's length.

Do I gather that SO lives alone? And son is getting increasingly anxious about SO's ability to cope?

I'll pause there to check I haven't got it all wrong so far?
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