Am I responsible for my mother-in-law who cannot take care of herself? - AgingCare.com

Am I responsible for my mother-in-law who cannot take care of herself?

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Am I bound by any laws for providing care? She is currently in the hospital being treated for a serious infection and is receiving daily wound care. She is unable to walk due to her current illness and requires around the clock care. The hospital cannot release her to skilled care until she is less combative, she is currently restrained and must be stable for more than 24 hours. The case workers are informing us that we are responsible for her care after she is released from skilled care. What are our options ? I work full time and cannot afford to quit working to care for my mother. She has no assets and is on a fixed income from social security. Any information or guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Laura


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CameoJRC: However, I caution you to be careful with NH's. They could pull a fast one on you like they did to my late mother. I had moved in with mother from 400 miles away....for 6 months. My brother finally arrived for his week stay. Our mother was in an NH in a rehab bed expected (by us, because she couldn't continue to live alone like she had been doing) to be transferred to a long-term care bed when they told ALL of us "maam, you're too well to stay here." They were VERY MUCH INCORRECT because less than 48 hrs later she suffered a stroke there. She deceased later at the hospital.
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CameoJRC: It is the hospital's responsibility to place your loved one in the rehab unit of a Nursing Home when a rehab bed becomes available. Under no circumstances are you responsible for caring for your ill elder! Here's a big reason why: YOU ARE NOT MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS!!
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CameoJRC: See below---

This situation is not uncommon: When an aging parent needs care, it's often one child out of several siblings who steps up to the plate to offer help. And with more Americans living longer -- to 75 years and beyond -- this scenario will only become more familiar.

So this tells you that the adult children who aren't the caregivers are not getting in any legal trouble.
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I'm not sure how old this thread is but DON'T DO IT. I took my gma groceries and to the dr the week after my mom died. She has been my responsibility since then. I've been so desperate that I've called APS...ON MYSELF. Once you start, you will be bullied, threatened, intimidated etc. My "grandma" has been a horrible person her whole life. Everyone else ran as fast as they could away from her. My mom, an only child was stuck with her till the day she died. I've called every agency and told them I QUIT. but no. slavery apparently isn't against the law when it's the state imposes it. 3 years I've been told "she's independent. She has rights. She can live where and how she chooses. But YOU are responsible for her choices" under the threat of "charges of elder neglect and abandonment". When this is done I WILL make the proverbial federal case out of this. So stay tuned.
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unfortunately....soooo many times, you have to throw a fit...and loudly!!! it works!!
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The NH should have a social worker. Make it VERY clear there is no one at home that can provide the care he needs and that includes you. The NH can be in legal hot water trying to send a person home to an environment that they cannot be properly cared for . DO NOT let them bully you.Stand your ground!
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HERE IS A RELATED QUESTION. Am I legally responsible to take my husband home when he is released from rehab in a local nursing home?

He had a stroke in 2009 and recently fell and broke his hip. I am 70 years old and I have health issues that make it difficult for me to care for him at home. Before the broken hip, he was living at home with me (helped by 4 hours per week from home health aides). He is wheel-chair bound and he is 74 years old.
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I think it all comes down to Medicaid. They don't want anymore people on it than they have to have. You do have to be really firm. My daughter is good at it since she is an RN and knows what she is talking about. I can't understand why they want to send her home. Here, if u can't walk rehab is a given.
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Good for you, Beenthere. It seems as though a lot of hospitals play the guilt card with families who don't know what the rules are. This is an amazing forum for enlightenment !
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No you're not responsible for taking care of your MIL.
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