I work at an Alzheimer's unit, a resident always asks where her husband is? What's the best way to answer her? - AgingCare.com

I work at an Alzheimer's unit, a resident always asks where her husband is? What's the best way to answer her?

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Her husband passed away 3 years ago. What's the way to approach her she's always get anxiety if we tell her the truth.

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Good for you for asking. I agree with the advice.
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Hi Dodatotis. Since you work in an Alz Unit, I think you will need to learn a whole new way of dealing with your clients/residents. I strongly recommend watching Teepa Snow's YouTube videos. She helps both family caregivers and professionals like yourself on understanding people with Alz and how to react with them. Teepa has several free mini videos that you can watch if you have limited time to spare. Or if you're into watching it deeply at one time - you can order her videos ..I think in Amazon? For now, I'm just watching the freebies in YouTube.
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I appreciate that you reached out for an answer, but shouldn't your supervisors be training you??? I agree with Angelkw.... this has me very concerned... I too work with Alz patients in home settings... but I have educated myself... read any and everything about Alz... the facility you work for should have mandatory teaching and training.... if you are given such a great responsibility with no training, maybe you should seek out other employment.....sounds as if you want to do the right thing.....

One of the answers to your question, from my own experience is, do what I call 'loving lies'..... tell her he went to the store.... that he will be back in a few minutes, and then try to redirect her... as in..... asking about her childhood home, her friends, anything to help get her mind on a different track.... it is useless to tell her the truth... she will be in a constant state of grief.... sometimes we have to use our imagination , with compassion , to help them... you have to go to her world... she doesn't live in ours anymore.....

I really hope you get another job where you will be taught and trained... Sounds as tho you would be an asset to any facility because of your concerns... but find one that will not hold you liable for any mistakes you make without training....

Education is the key to helping those with Alz/dementia... whether you are a paid caregiver or family...... let us know about this... as I am very concerned...
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I don't have an answer for your question, but I wanted to say that this question terrifies me. You work in an alzhiemer's unit and you have not been taught, through your education, training, from your supervisors, or from the wishes of the family on how to interact with a patient?
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