I want to research smart shower designs. Any suggestions?

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I want to enlarge my bathroom to accommodate a wheel bound person with arthritis.

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PS: don't forget heating, cooling and ventilation. You must have a vent fan that is properly sized and vented to the outside, not just to the attic as is often done. This will just pump warm moist air into the attic causing mold and mildew.

Depending on your current heat/cooling system it may not take much to deal with the remodeled space. If you need extra heat an electric baseboard heater is simple and cheap. Also underfloor electric grids, used mostly with tile floors are very popular. This makes very nice even heat but it does take longer to heat up and cool down.
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DTN, at this point the primary consideration is do you ave enough space. You mentioned well chair accessible I think, and that requires more space than you would think. One thing you might do is visit a local nursing home or assited living facility and checkout the bathrooms. You'll get some good ideas.

Also, beware of the contractors that claim "we do it all" . If any plumbing or wiring is involved, and it almost always is, this needs to be done by licensed plumbers and electricians, not by uncle Harry's nephew or some handman. There's nothing worse than your beautiful new bathroom be torn apart to fix bad wring and plumbing that leaks. Experienced contractors will have subcontractors they use on a regular basis for wiring, plumbing, tile work etc. Check with neighbors, friends and family for contractors they have used in your area.
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Hi Windyridge, Yes, I will be breaking down one wall and enlarge the area, door access included. I live in a regular 70s bungalow, featuring a confined space for the bathroom. So I need ideas to make it accessible for a wheelchair. Day one of my research and I have already come be some useful tips: making the area a wet room with a single slope drain, wall-hung toilet and vanity sink. I would have to figure out if I have enough room for a step in bathtub (with grab bars of course - I like the idea of a heated grab bar), but my parents can no longer bath in a tub. I am worried about the flooring; I would need to ensure that it minimizes risk of slipping as one walks on the wet surface. My mom has osteoporosis. Finally, I do have a lot of things to consider. ...and it will most likely be costly, but if it is planned out properly I should be fine. I also have to figure out how to secure my two huge huskies when I am not around!! I am not one to join in any social network, but this one serves a real purpose for me.
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DTN, Windy's an electrician; he speaks with more technical knowledge than I could ever understand, and from what little I know, he's right about the potential of costs soaring.

JudeAH53 recently discussed this issue; you could probably get some ideas from her post:

Bathing options - which would you choose and why?https://www.agingcare.com/questions/bathing-options-183353.htm
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Thank you garden artist! Yes, I am at the beginning of my research - day one. I need to learn the lingo; universal design - got that down. I will certainly check in with the local authorities on the subject. I have always been hands on in my renovation projects, however I will refer to those with experience to guide me.
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1. Since you're taking your time to research and plan, contact the Area Agency on Aging office in your area and ask if they sponsor an annual Caregiver's Expo. We go and have gotten brochures from buildings/companies providing assistive, or aging in place, retrofitting. You can see what they do, get quotes, and compare.

2. I think it's better to go with a company that focuses on this because (a) they'll have more experience, and (b) I've read that some builders and remodelers don't normally get involved with what's considered a niche area. However, if you have a contractor you've used in the past and are pleased with him/her, that's an option as well.

3. Google the topic and see what's available; there are different tub/shower configurations. Without knowing what the existing bathroom looks like, I'm guessing you might have to replace a vanity with a pedestal sink to allow the wheelchair to roll up to it, widen the doorways, add more grab bars, and replace the tub.

4. I vaguely have some recollection about replumbing to accommodate a differently configured tub but don't recall all the details.

You might want to consider adding something like a heated towel bar for warmth very quickly after baths or showers.

5. Once you've figured out what you want, create your own workscope and then get estimates. If you do that, all the contractors are working from the same basic elements. I've found that even though I did have a work scope for some remodeling of my sister's house, some of the contractors wanted to ignore that and dictate what THEY thought was best - high end, over the top changes i didn't want or could afford.

Consider their recommendations, as they are the pros, but if they go beyond what you want and have stated you want, think seriously about whether you want to deal with someone like that if the changes aren't going to help your loved one.

6. Obviously, check their licensing with your state department that handles that, get a copy of their liability summary page, contact that insurer to make sure the coverage is still in place. References are also desirable.
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You're probably talking about lots of money. Post some more details. What's the house like now? Are we talking about knocking down walls? Gotta move plumbing and wiring? Goggle it. There's scads of info on line.
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